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The sentence is:

This is what they have been reduced to be doing to.

I'm ok with understanding how This is what they have been reduced to is correct, but the to be doing to part in original sentence kinda confuses me. Thanks a lot.

  • Can you add some context? The sentence in question doesn't sound quite right to me, but additional information may help. – ebernard May 13 '15 at 15:16
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    "This is what they have been reduced to doing" works. More context for the original would be beneficial. – Andrew Leach May 13 '15 at 15:23
  • Let's say person A repetitively forced person B do something. I want to disparage person B for being so weak. So I say "this is what you've been reduced to". But it's too general, and I want to emphasize doing what I'm disparaging that person for, so I say "this is what you've been reduced to be doing to". – user75619 May 13 '15 at 15:37
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There is clearly one too many "to" - no matter how you twist it, they both are a preposition referring to the words "be doing", so the second one is redundant. They are reduced to be doing this. This is what they are reduced to be doing.

Stylistically, however, "This is what they have been reduced to" is simpler and clearer. More importantly, here the preposition refers to the pronoun "this", whereas in the the sentences above, "this" is the object of the verb "to do".

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