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I'm looking for an adjective that captures the meaning of 'capable of integration' in a systems/software context (so not integrable in mathematical context). Integratable seems to be somewhat in use, but I'm not quite sure if it's proper English in the first place and whether it'd be broadly understood.

Would integratable be an acceptable choice, or are there better alternatives?

  • Can you use 'easily integrated'? If technical people are using 'integratable,' use it within their documentation without worry about proper English. Because it is, in fact, proper to tailor writing to the audience you are addressing. – Yosef Baskin Apr 4 '17 at 21:06
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I think you are looking for integrable

  • capable of being integrated, integrable functions (M-W)

From: A COMPUTER SYSTEM, INTEGRABLE SOFTWARE COMPONENT AND SOFTWARE APPLICATION

  • A computer system is provided comprising a software application. The software application comprises a host application and an integrable software component integrated with the host application for implementing controls in the host application.

(www.patentscope.wipo.int)

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I don't think its necessarily wrong, but I don't thing its very euphonic, either. If I were writing it, I'd go with "can be integrated with...".

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Seems like a useful term to me in the context of data integration, allowing distinction from the mathematical sense of integration, and software component integration. Something like

integratable: data values from different sources can be used in an application as if they were part of a single data set, to obtain scientifically sound results.

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You know? Some words just have a snooty stuffiness about them. And the word "integrable" is one of them. That's why I decided to do a search to see if either "integratable" or "integratible" are acceptable. Since there seems to be no "correct" answer, and the original "asker" is leaning toward using "integratable" -- the same as me -- that gives me the confidence to just go with that.

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Integratable is a word according to Merriam-Webster, so I am going with it. I came across Stack Exchange when searching the validity of "itegratable". I am also using it in a technical document, so the phrase easily integrated is not at all accurate for my application - my thing is integratable, but not easily integrated.

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