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Both my boys will be graduating from two different schools and in an invitation I'm inviting everyone to "Ragen's and Connor's graduation". So I show possessive for with both boys and would the word "graduation" be singular or plural??

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    I would definitely put graduation in the plural. Then it seems a toss up as to whether to say You are invited to the graduations of Ragen and Connor; or ...to Ragen's and Connor's graduations. Personally I prefer the first as it seems to offer more clarity to their being separate. presumably you will be providing more detail that makes it clear that they are at separate schools. – WS2 May 5 '15 at 16:50
  • Incidentally both boys are graduating from different schools suggests that each is graduating from more than one school. I think you meant to say either each boy is graduating from a different school, or the boys are graduating from different schools, which mean the same thing. – WS2 May 5 '15 at 17:00
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I would write an invitation to...

... celebrate Ragen's and Connor's graduations

but I think

... celebrate Ragen's and Connor's graduation

is fine too. - The plural makes it clear that both of them have independently graduated.

Also you could, of course, have

.... to celebrate the graduations of Ragen and Connor

or

.... to celebrate the graduation of Ragen and Connor

with this second way around I think I would go for the singular. '.... to celebrate the graduation of Ragen and Connor'

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    I disagree - there are two separate graduations, so it should be plural, regardless of how the sentence is constructed. – Nicole May 5 '15 at 18:12
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Because you are referring to two separate graduations, you could write it as:

To celebrate the graduations of Ragen and Connor

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My experience is that there is never enough room for everyone who wants to attend a graduation ceremony to fit into the space provided, so I assume you are inviting friends to the celebration that you are throwing after the formal events.

So, why not try "Ragen's and Connor's graduation celebration"?

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