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What may a "complete sentence contain"? May it contain a "subject" and a "verb"?

May it contain an "object" and/or a "subject"?

I thank you.

closed as off-topic by tchrist, Drew, Ellie Kesselman, Vilmar, Chenmunka May 5 '15 at 14:44

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A correct answer to your question as written is "A sentence may contain a word."

I think I may know what question you are really trying to ask but I'm not sure. But I'm pretty sure it is not the question you asked.

I think you are not asking 'what parts may be included in a sentence (among possibly others)' , but 'what may a sentence may comprise?' That is, what are the parts of which a sentence may wholly consist.

One interesting part of the answer would give minimal forms of a legal sentence. A sentence comprising an interjection, such as "Oh!", would be among the answers. "Oh, what a fool!" would be another. "Oh, what a fool he was!" would be another.

The full answer is work to be done. A sentence can have limitless independent clauses connected by conjunctions, and limitless dependent clauses. The answer will need to specify what a dependent or independent clause may comprise. Etc. The complete specification that answers your question is beyond me.

  • By the way, I didn't intend this to be an answer. I meant it to be a comment on the question. – Bob May 5 '15 at 1:20
  • I thank you. "A sentence may contain a word.", so, I guess, "Oh!" may seem like a, "complete sentence", maybe, like, an, "interjection". That may seem interesting. I think I, maybe, thought: A sentence, mostly, maybe aims to get a thing, doing something. I thank you, Bob. I don't think I seem to aim to write in a place I seem, maybe, not liked. You seemed to write, maybe, interesting, information. I may write in a different place, may I seem, maybe, not liked. I write to thank you, Bob. – saySay May 6 '15 at 1:45

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