1

Especially a thought.

Example:

Like last night, I couldn't sleep. This time, however, [...] wasn't my upcoming wedding, but the fact that I was going to get fired tomorrow.

So like a disturbance, but one that deprives you from sleep.

7
  • Hah. In business jargon, we often ask "What [worries, troubles, concerns, anxieties] keeps you up at night?".
    – Dan Bron
    Apr 29, 2015 at 11:51
  • The "monster under my bed".
    – Hot Licks
    Apr 29, 2015 at 12:17
  • Things that go bump in the night.
    – Hot Licks
    Apr 29, 2015 at 12:45
  • 1
    So you are getting married right after getting fired! Tough break, pal. Good luck.
    – Tushar Raj
    Apr 29, 2015 at 13:26
  • 1
    Simply it.
    – ermanen
    Apr 29, 2015 at 14:52

3 Answers 3

3

Scientific answer: stressor.

Colloquial answer: bugaboo.

(Either of these will fit in your sentence example. Use with "the".)

1

This time, however, my emotional distress wasn't due to my upcoming wedding, but to the fact that I was going to get fired tomorrow.

or

This time, however, the distressing factor wasn't my upcoming wedding, but the fact that I was going to get fired tomorrow.

  • distress (noun) "unhappiness or pain; suffering that affects the mind or body" MW
  • distressing (adj) "causing worry or anxiety" TFD
0

Not disagreeing with Centaurus, but for another approach you could do something along the lines of sleep-killer. (There's a quote in The Scottish Play about that.)

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