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Example:

I already knew about what she said. Her words were merely a [...].

I checked Thesaurus but none of the synonyms seem like a metaphor/expression. Maybe go ahead?

  • 1
    How do you feel about "just a formality"? – Dan Bron Apr 28 '15 at 14:51
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    Using 'merely' makes it sound like 'rubber stamp' would do. – Mitch Apr 28 '15 at 14:55
  • '.. an endorsement', but I'd use 'merely confirmed my opinion'. – Edwin Ashworth Apr 28 '15 at 15:51
  • A go ahead means that you can continue to do something as planned. A confirmation as in your example sentence means that you are told what you already (thought you) knew. These are two different things. Which one are you looking for? – oerkelens Apr 29 '15 at 10:24
  • @oerkelens I don't know. I think both works. – janoChen Apr 29 '15 at 11:40
4

"an acknowledgement" or "an affirmation"

I already knew about what she said. Her words were merely an acknowledgement.

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    While these words are synonyms, they're not metaphors (as specified in the question). – user11752 Apr 28 '15 at 15:43
  • Asking for metaphors would be off-topic in any case. Idioms and expressions would be on-topic. – TRomano Apr 28 '15 at 17:12
  • @Tim Romano - the "Metaphors" tag currently indicates 7 asked this month, 59 this year. – user98990 Apr 28 '15 at 18:14
2

What's a metaphor/expression for “confirmation”?

American car-culture has created the idiom give somebody/something the green light (as opposed to a red light) based on our experience of waiting in our automobiles at traffic lights.

green light:

To give permission for something to happen; "She's waiting for her doctor to give her the green light to play in Saturday's game."

Usage notes: also used in the form give a green light: "The House of Representatives gave a green light to oil exploration off the East Coast."

The Free Dictionary green light

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    It's similar to giving someone a go ahead? – janoChen Apr 28 '15 at 15:01
  • exactly, jano ... – user98990 Apr 28 '15 at 15:02
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    Not that this would usually be confused with green light meaning "the go-ahead", but being "green lit" also means there's a hit out on you by a gang or the mob. :-) – Kristina Lopez Apr 28 '15 at 15:31
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    Really? @Kristina Lopez - thanks for the tip. That's a new meaning for me. – user98990 Apr 28 '15 at 15:35
  • A go ahead means that you can continue to do something as planned. A confirmation as in your example sentence means that you are told what you already (thought you) knew. These are two different things. The green light means "yes, do it" not "yes, your assumption is correct". – oerkelens Apr 29 '15 at 10:25
1

If you want a metaphor, perhaps icing on the cake

An attractive but inessential addition or enhancement

Oxford Dictionaries Online

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We can say that her words corroborated what you already knew. They were a corroboration.

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