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I have a follow up question to using "Similarly to" at the beginning of a sentence.

"similarly to" in the sentence beginning suggests to use "As in".

Does "as in" mean "equally" or just "similar to"?

Example sentence: "Similarly to DSST, we only use the first 27-channels of the FHOG feature map appended with a gray-scale image for the translational filter of DSSTcpp."

"As in the DSST tracker, we only use the first 27-channels of the FHOG feature map appended with a gray-scale image for the translational filter of DSSTcpp."

The sentence should reflect a similarity, but DSSTcpp is not euqal to DSST.

Thanks myro

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  • 'As in' only works with certain sentences. 'As is the case with ...' overlaps far more closely with 'Like ...'. Apr 25, 2015 at 23:33

2 Answers 2

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"As in" doesn't necessarily mean the two things being compared are equals, but it can convey that. The definition of "as": to the same degree, amount, or extent; similarly; equally. So when using "as in", you are essentially saying "[to the same or similar degree] in the DSST tracker".

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The phrase you are looking for is just as.

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  • This doesn't really answer the question of what "as in" means - and the asker is looking for something that means similar. I would think "just as" would mean equal to.
    – Nicole
    Apr 26, 2015 at 2:14

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