1

I came to this website searching 'difference between language and grammar' and found this question “What is the difference between grammar and usage?” I thought on what was said there and came to realize the word 'usage' is given its own place as a term. Which seems to be an expression of cognitive fallacy in the development of the language or at least the organization of the rule. Before someone begins their freak out response please give me a chance to finish some more context for the answer I am looking for.

Originally I defined language as the stylized set of rules and assets (all things dealing in individual words) that defines all usability of its spoken and written forms. I looked at a definition of grammar "the whole system and structure of a language or of languages in general, usually taken as consisting of syntax and morphology (including inflections) and sometimes also phonology and semantics." and then another and another till even lexicon and dictation was able to be included under grammar.

Maybe the issue is within the orderability of the many rules. An inability maybe to assign of sequential priority to each rule except maybe categorically. Getting sentence structure right then dealing with plural rules next, as an example. The question may need to be answered if it is in fact appropriate for rules to exist that hold a definitive placing in usability but not covered under grammar. Once again more simply put, is there some sort of definitive reason that separates grammar from usage. I am not qualified to say, but feel that would be what makes Language distinctly different from grammar as it would be comprised of then of more than one super subject.

As a final message to whoever replies I feel strongly someone is capable to define these terms without resorting to examples for pattern matching as substitute for an earnest description.

  • Try trimming your last two paragraphs, or even deleting the last one, in order to fit the first paragraph. There's probably a character limit for newcomers . The question (Could you remind us?) needs an introduction. – Mari-Lou A Apr 25 '15 at 6:45
  • A grammar is the set of rules by which a language is spoken, often differing between generations, communities, and even individual speakers. The language itself comprises myriad parts, including grammar, syntax, lexicon, diction, phonology, and so on and so forth. – Anonym Apr 25 '15 at 7:08
  • 1
    I have no idea what the actual question here is … – Janus Bahs Jacquet Apr 25 '15 at 7:33
  • Mari-Lou A thank you I attempted refining it. What was wrote was in hopes to prevent responses like the anonym above. I asked for an earnest answer meaning showing sincere and intense conviction. Not for dramatics, but for quality as it is an unusual question it seems. – Ryan Eyestone Apr 25 '15 at 7:36
  • 1
    Could it be said that | Language is the conventional identifier of a spoken and or written system where as grammar is the descriptive rules in which a language follows and multiple languages may share or relate. | ?? or is that not complete enough? – Ryan Eyestone Apr 25 '15 at 8:49
2

A dictionary provides some help here:

Language

The method of human communication, either spoken or written, consisting of the use of words in a structured and conventional way. [ODO]

Grammar

The whole system and structure of a language or of languages in general, usually taken as consisting of syntax and morphology (including inflections) and sometimes also phonology and semantics. [ODO]

Language is the means of communication, and grammar is the rules which make a language intelligible. In this regard, your own analysis seems reasonable:

Language is the conventional identifier of a spoken and or written system where as grammar is the descriptive rules in which a language follows and multiple languages may share or relate.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.