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In When Tomorrow Starts Without Me , there are two sentences which are like this:

And when I thought of worldly things I might miss, come tomorrow.

I thought of you, and when I did, my heart was filled with sorrow.

I want to know in the second sentence, where it says "come tomorrow", is this some kind of a method to write a poem (with two verbs in one sentence)?

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    There is actually a comma after miss and not after things. books.google.it/… – user66974 Apr 24 '15 at 9:23
  • And when I thought of worldly things I might miss, come tomorrow. I thought of you and when I did, my heart was filled with sorrow. – user66974 Apr 24 '15 at 9:24
  • "come tomorrow" simply means "when it will be tomorrow". It's a poetic way of just saying tomorrow. Maybe that helps in understanding the whole sentence? – oerkelens Apr 24 '15 at 9:29
  • 'When tomorrow comes / gets here' shows the tie-in more clearly. 'When tomorrow gets here' would be stylistically inappropriate here. The full stop in the original is arguably incorrect; a comma would be expected, but then we have clutter. An ellipsis or zero punctuation are better. – Edwin Ashworth Apr 24 '15 at 9:31
  • tomorrow comes may sound more grammatical, but the poet needed a word to rhyme with sorrow. – user66974 Apr 24 '15 at 9:31
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Come is not a verb here, but a preposition.

From oxford:

preposition

informal When a specified time is reached or event happens:

I don’t think that they’ll be far away from honours come the new season

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