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Should we use singular verb with the subject/subjects "science and technology"? For example,

Science and technology have a prominent influence in the modern world.

Is this sentence correct? Please explain the logic behind it.

marked as duplicate by FumbleFingers, choster, Peter Shor , Edwin Ashworth, tchrist Apr 28 '15 at 11:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Show some full sentences in context. Also, have you looked it up at Google Books? – Marius Hancu Apr 23 '15 at 14:43
  • The sentence goes like this: Science and technology have a prominent influence in the modern world. Is it correct? – Indrajit Ray Apr 23 '15 at 14:52
  • Both is and are are correct in that sentence. – Peter Shor Apr 23 '15 at 14:57
  • Sir, if you can explain the logic behind it, it would be of great help. – Indrajit Ray Apr 23 '15 at 14:59
  • @Indrajit Ray: From the answer to the earlier question of which this is a duplicate, you'd use the singular verb form with a compound phrase that very often occurs together and which people conceptualize as a single thing. I'm not going to look for any others, but I'm quite sure effectively the same question has been asked many times before on ELU. – FumbleFingers Apr 23 '15 at 15:54

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