1

Is the use of the adverb instead appropriate, and correct, in the last of the following three sentences?

The top half of the figure shows the service provided by the system in a first, generic scenario. It is easy to see that the system …. The bottom half of the figure shows instead the service provided by the system in a second, more complex scenario.

If the adverb instead is appropriate in the last sentence, must/should it however be moved elsewhere, or must the sentence be changed in some other way?

If it is not correct to use instead in that sentence, what would be the best ways to introduce the second item in the above example?

Thanks.

6
  • It is correct as shown. "Instead" modified "shows". The reversed order (vs "instead shows") is slightly unusual for an adverb, but is idiomatic for "instead".
    – Hot Licks
    Apr 23, 2015 at 14:07
  • 1
    I don't think instead is very appropriate there. As the etymology suggests, it's generally used in contexts where there's an element of substitution or replacement (of whatever's normally involved). Apr 23, 2015 at 14:20
  • Related:english.stackexchange.com/questions/192003/…
    – user66974
    Apr 23, 2015 at 14:25
  • @FumbleFingers - instead is perfectly appropriate, provided the distance from the original option is not too great.
    – Hot Licks
    Apr 23, 2015 at 14:37
  • 1
    I think you should introduce the second part with 'while/whereas' like, While the bottom half... Apr 28, 2015 at 17:14

4 Answers 4

1

'Instead' is properly placed. It gives such a sense as can be had from this sentence:

"She drank cofee but I took tea instead."

But, truly speaking, 'instead' is used more in the place of something mentioned earlier as___I was going to go shopping but I went dancing instead. This is why Dan,for his squeamishness, is not ready to use it at all.

If, by any standard, I am asked to give the sentence a rendering, "INSTEAD" would be removed and the sentence will begin with 'whereas' or 'whilst on the contrary' or something more befitting.

0

Alternatives:

The top half of the figure shows the service provided by the system in a first, generic scenario. It is easy to see that the system …. The bottom half of the figure shows /instead/alternately/ the service provided by the system in a second, more complex scenario.

The top half of the figure shows the service provided by the system in a first, generic scenario. It is easy to see that the system …. /By comparison/Alternately/, the bottom half of the figure shows the service provided by the system in a second, more complex scenario.

0

I would not use instead at all. The content is clear without it. If you really want to draw attention to the second version ('more complex scenario') you could start it as a new paragraph.

-1

I believe instead comes from a Germanic/Scandinavian root related to "place". For example, Norwegian "po stede" for "at his post, or place of work". It therefore has the feeling that A instead of B is A in the same place as B and also replacing B. From that viewpoint, your quoted usage is perfectly correct, even if the page positions are upper and lower, because it is the showing that is the relevant "place" rather than the position on the page.

6
  • But this is the viewpoint known as the etymological fallacy. Oct 29, 2015 at 14:19
  • Edwin, I disagree that this is "the" or any other etymological fallacy. I doubt it deserves any such status. And in any case, we have the examples of "in his stead", "housestead", "farmstead", "stand in good stead" and many more examples in which stead means or implies "place". Old English stede; related to Old Norse stathr, place, Old High German stat, place, Latin statiō a standing
    – Anton
    Oct 30, 2015 at 22:02
  • Etymological fallacy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymological_fallacy The etymological fallacy is a genetic fallacy that holds that the present-day meaning of a word or phrase should necessarily be similar to its historical meaning. Oct 30, 2015 at 22:16
  • Quite so. There is no general necessity for such continuity of meaning from past to present but it may nevertheless apply to specific instances, as in this case. So what has that fallacy to do with this specific case, where historical meaning accords with the contemporary examples that I adduce to illustrate the present meaning of "stead"?
    – Anton
    Oct 31, 2015 at 23:46
  • 'I believe instead comes from a Germanic/Scandinavian root related to "place". For example, Norwegian "po stede" for "at his post, or place of work". It therefore has the feeling that ...' is false reasoning. To me, 'instead' as in Barid's example "She drank coffee but I took tea instead." doesn't automatically evoke the metaphor doubtlessly involved in the etymology. It evokes 'alternative'. FF seems not to feel too happy with the usage here. And I'd not use it; 'similarly shows' works far better. It sounds better to draw out the similarity, not the contrast. And 'on the other hand' would ... Nov 1, 2015 at 0:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.