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I am looking for a word or succinct descriptor for a person whose appearance has changed such that they are no longer found to be physically attractive by the speaker/writer.

The ideal answer should be gender-neutral (or readily gender-flexible) and avoid the implication that the essential "worth" of the person in question has somehow changed because the speaker/writer no longer finds them physically attractive. The purpose is simply to note the fact of the event, not make a value statement about it.

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    no-longer found attractive is pejorative. They might be weathered or aged or worn but those qualities may well be endearing to loved ones or considered pejorative by the subject. – Jim Apr 22 '15 at 5:08
  • By non-pejorative, I meant that it should avoid the implication that the essential "worth" of the person in question has somehow changed because the speaker/writer no longer finds them physically attractive. Which is actually a better way of putting it - I will edit the question accordingly. – Quoi Apr 22 '15 at 5:13
  • Past one's prime: though that's pretty broad, not just about looks. – Kris Apr 22 '15 at 5:14
  • Whatever word you find, it will be pejorative, unless it is a hypocrisy. But in this case, you could say he/she still looks attractive as well. – alx Apr 22 '15 at 5:18
  • "Past one's prime" also suggests to me that the change in question is one that would be broadly recognized in the same way, which is not necessarily the case here. – Quoi Apr 22 '15 at 5:18
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The following is a gentle, and poetic way of saying a person is no longer the same fresh-looking attractive individual they once were. This does not necessarily entail that they are now physically unattractive, but it could be used that way.

Bloom Of Youth

  1. In the very bloom of youth, tall, slender, and handsome, he had a grace of manner not to be resisted.
  2. But the Grant Girls had lost the Spring-time bloom of their youth.
  3. In bloom of youth and beauty,
    But yesterday she shone;
    And her fond parents thought her
    A mine of wealth unknown.

You could shift the onus onto sexual arousal and chemistry. The expression "to be turned on" is used in similar cases:

  • I'm not turned on by you

  • I used to be turned on by you

Alternatively, in plain simple words say the following with used to be

  • You used to be slimmer/prettier/more handsome/fitter. . .
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She/he looks mature is a hypocritical way to say the person does no look as young as before:

Dictionary.com

adjective, maturer, maturest.

  1. complete in natural growth or development, as plant and animal forms: a mature rose bush.

2.ripe, as fruit, or fully aged, as cheese or wine.

  • This seems only relevant if the change in question is implicitly the result of aging? – Quoi Apr 22 '15 at 5:26
  • Depends on the context. You can use both to say 'one has grown up', and 'one has grown old(er)' – alx Apr 22 '15 at 5:28
  • @Jeff Yes, definitely this means only aging change. If someone has put on weight, this does not apply. – alx Apr 22 '15 at 5:31
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How about "The bloom is off the rose" ? or "Has aged gracefully"

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