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I did read they were interchangeable, "for" and "of". But what about using them with words that typically use one or the other?

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to instill respect for and knowledge of our policies

vs.

to instill respect and knowledge of our policies

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Are they both valid sentences (fragments)? To me the latter sounds like I'm saying to just "instill respect" with no reference to the subject (policies) or "instill respect of our policies" which may or may not make sense

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to instill respect and knowledge of our policies

To me the latter sounds like I'm saying to just "instill respect" with no reference to the subject (policies)

This is basically correct, the respect here would be understood as respect "in general" or maybe "for (some) authority" depending on the context. Nonetheless, it would still probably be better spelt out as:

to instill respect and build knowledge of our policies

Respect is instilled, knowledge is built (or some other verb). Why? Because if the two nouns (respect and knowledge) apply to different subjects (some implied authority, and the policies), it is better to distinguish them with different verbs as well to be clear what you are saying.

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