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Is this sentence correct?

My mother and best friend loves cooking as much as I do.

Considering that I'm referring to the same person here, would it be better if I put it this way:

My mother and my best friend loves cooking as much as I do.

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    Nicole's answer is correct, but I would avoid this phrasing. Even without the 'my' it still sounds like you're referring to two different people and just got the subject-verb agreement wrong. I would suggest an alternate phrasing that clarifies that 'best friend' is a qualifier on mother and not a separate person. For instance: "My mother, my best friend, loves cooking as much as I do." Then there is no ambiguity. – Lynn Apr 21 '15 at 2:00
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If you are referring to the same person, then "My mother and best friend loves cooking as much as I do" is correct. If you say "My mother and my best friend", it sounds like you're talking about two different people.

Edit: (Thanks to @sumelic - I was searching for a while until I saw the added tags that helped me figure out exactly what parts of speech these were.)

I found this article from Merriam Webster. In it, it states:

SINGULAR SUBJECT: The dog barks every morning. ... TWO SINGULAR: The dog and the cat bother me. TWO PLURAL: The dogs and the cats bother me. ONE SINGULAR, ONE PLURAL: The dog and cats bother me.

Since your mother is one singular subject, it should mirror the first sentence:

The dog barks every morning. = My mother and best friend loves cooking as much as I do.

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  • Are there any explanation to this or reference that I can check? I'll have to teach this to my students. – Mae Apr 21 '15 at 1:17
  • Yes, I'll edit my answer to include that. – Nicole Apr 21 '15 at 1:30
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The only way the singular would work is the apposition:

My mother, my best friend, loves cooking as much as I do.

or the better-sounding non-restrictive relative:

My mother, who is also my best friend, loves cooking as much as I do.

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  • I disagree. The structure works just fine for me. "The king and ruler of England is..." In speech, intonation would clearly indicate that the mother and best friend were the same person. – user0721090601 Apr 21 '15 at 14:07

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