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This question already has an answer here:

Is it proper to say:

Please join me, my family and crew in celebrating my Bat Mitzvah?

Or should there be a 'my' before crew?

marked as duplicate by Mitch, tchrist, Kristina Lopez, ScotM, ermanen Apr 22 '15 at 0:13

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    Crew is a fairly unusual word to use for an invitation to a religious ceremony. It implies the crew members have some unified structure, and you're in command of them; it doesn't just indicate that you're a member of the group. There's no need to repeat my before crew, but it should have a comma after family, and think hard about the last word. Mob? Friends? Whatever. – John Lawler Apr 20 '15 at 19:27
  • @JohnLawler There is surely a serious part to many religious ceremonies, but I think there is some leeway for levity. Man, best party ever for 13 year olds! – Mitch Apr 20 '15 at 19:40
  • @Mitch: True enough about levity. And Judaism has some of the best jokes of any religion, also true. And it's her Bat Mitzvah, truest of all. Whatever; it's just that crew has an interpretation, and the comma has an intonation. Nu, she's asking for information, she gets information. מזל טוב – John Lawler Apr 20 '15 at 20:32
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The "Oxford comma is irrelevant to this question.

Saying "my family and crew" implies that the crew is part of the family, not necessarily your crew. Saying "my family and my crew" implies that both the family and crew "belong" to you, which is probably what you are looking for.

In addition, unless you are a ship's captain, you may want to use an alternative collection reference rather than "crew", such as "friends", "gang", or "colleagues".

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my family and crew

it's out there:

National Geographic - Volume 188 - Page 88 1995

French long-liners. French Navy gunboats showed up. They fired on my boat with rubber bullets," he said, his eyes red with anger. "If these foreign boats are going to destroy our way of life, to take away the livelihood of my family and crew,

And no, the Oxford comma would be required only if this were:

*Please join me, my family, and the crew in celebrating my Bat Mitzvah?"

when the "crew" would be separated from "family."

The way you have it "my family and crew," "family" and "crew" are combined in a single unit for some. For others, it'd be just an elision of another "my," to avoid repetition.

If you used "crew" instead of "gang" I think you're fine with it as it is if you really want to make this light and casual.

Riccardo Tisci Interview - Givenchy, Joan Smalls, Lara ...

Apr 3, 2015 - I'm building relationships for years and years. I have my family and gang, which we carry on season after season. Since you approach things from the perspective of building long-term relationships, what do you look for when

But this my family and gang is relatively rare.

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