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Recently I've stumbled upon this sentence on the internet:

Home is everywhere your heart is.

Somehow it doesn't seem right to me. If I had to convey the same meaning, I would write something like this:

Home is wherever your heart is.

Or this:

Home is everywhere where your heart is.

Could you please clarify whether I'm right or not.

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2 Answers 2

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The definition of everywhere permits the first example of the OP:

adverb

1.0 In or to all places:
I’ve looked everywhere
everywhere she went she was feted


The definition of wherever includes the second example:

relative adverb

1.0 In or to whatever place (emphasizing a lack of restriction):
meet me wherever you like

1.1 In all places; regardless of where:


Where is used as a relative adverb as suggested by the third example:

2.0 The place or situation in which:
this is where I live


All four of the following constructions would be grammatically acceptable with slightly different nuances. The first would be idiomatic, while the fourth would be slightly redundant:

  • Home is where the heart is.
    Meaning: Home is the place in which the heart is.
  • Home is wherever the heart is.
    Meaning: Home is in whatever place the heart is.
  • Home is everywhere the heart is.
    Meaning: Home is in all places the heart is.
  • Home is everywhere where the heart is.
    Meaning: Home is in all places where the heart is.

If the original author intended to emphasize all places, then everywhere is the right selection.

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  • I still have trouble understanding what is the difference between the third and the fourth. What exactly does "where" change?
    – Lee Brown
    Apr 16, 2015 at 21:02
  • The extra where in the fourth construction is an unnecessary redundancy, because the where in everywhere provides both the locational and relational component the sentence needs to make sense. Using the extra where might prompt the reader to guess that the author intended to emphasize all places being home in addition to the relationship between heart and home.
    – ScotM
    Apr 17, 2015 at 16:56
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You can use everywhere literally, but the sentence probably uses it in an exaggerating way.

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