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I acknowledge that there is no subjunctive mood in English. However, there are variants of some words that we might regard as subjunctive variants. For example, 'might' is the, if you will, subjunctive inflection of 'may'.

Was there ever a subjunctive inflection of 'must'?

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    Must, being formed from an old preterite like might, should, could, and would (note the final -t/d suffix), is already as subjunctive as it can get. The present form is archaic and exists only in fixed formulas ("So mote it be"). – John Lawler Apr 13 '15 at 18:31
  • @JohnLawler. Okay, so then may is to might as mote is to must, but not as must is to mote. Is that true? – Hal Apr 13 '15 at 18:53
  • @JohnLawler. You've answered the question. Perhaps you could paste that as an answer so we can close the question? – Hal Apr 13 '15 at 18:54
  • I thought "may" itself is already a subjunctive. Similarly "will" originally was, and hence also used to describe the future which is generally contingent on uncertain things. I also don't know why you say there is no subjunctive mood in English (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_subjunctive). Just for example, "The law requires that a contract be in writing.". – user21820 May 1 '15 at 6:08
  • And "may/will/shall/can" are present subjunctives while "might/would/should/could" are past subjunctives. – user21820 May 1 '15 at 6:17
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Must, being formed from an old preterite like might, should, could, and would (note the final -t/d suffix), is already as subjunctive as it can get. The present form is archaic and exists only in fixed formulas ("So mote it be"). – John Lawler Apr 13 at 18:31

(Citation added)

@JohnLawler. You've answered the question. Perhaps you could paste that as an answer so we can close the question? – Hal Apr 13 at 18:54

Mister Chairman! I motion to close.

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