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That way my mom can move on, find someone else, despite having sworn she'd only marry God."

That way my mom can move on, find someone else, though she swore she'd only marry God."

That way my mom can move on, find someone else, even though she swore she'd only marry God."

Which is the correct option? Or at least the one that sounds most natural/less formal?

2 Answers 2

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The first one is correct.

You have to phrase the others like this:

That way my mom can move on, find someone else, (even) though she swore she'd only marry God."

EDIT: If you're trying to decide which one sounds the least formal, I'd say go with the third one.

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  • Oh, yeah that's how I wrote it initially. I updated it in the aswer.
    – janoChen
    Apr 10, 2015 at 8:28
  • @janoChen: Despite sounds a bit more formal. I'd pick the 3rd one to sound natural.
    – Tushar Raj
    Apr 10, 2015 at 8:42
  • I see, the second one sounds weird?
    – janoChen
    Apr 10, 2015 at 8:45
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    @janoChen: Little bit, yeah.
    – Tushar Raj
    Apr 10, 2015 at 8:46
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If by correct you mean grammatical, then all three sentences are grammatical, although some might argue for inserting an and after move on,.

As for formality, my intuitive response on reading the sentences was that the despite variant is the most formal. This may be because the despite having + past participle seems less common than the (even) though + subject + past tense variant - as these two Ngrams show: sworn - said.

In terms of semantics, both the despite variant and the even though variant suggest to me a stronger contrast between what she swore and what she should now do.

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