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Many people call it "Rush-hour" when there is a lot of traffic on roads in the morning or evening. Should not it be called "Rush-hours" because the huge traffic continues for many hours during that time??

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    Rush hour: A regular period of heavy traffic, especially at the beginning or end of a workday. It is an idiomatic expression that refers to a specific period that may last less but generally more than an hour. Rush hours suggest a number of these periods: I.e. ...during morning rush hours, that is the rush hour that you have every morning. thefreedictionary.com/rush-hour – user66974 Apr 6 '15 at 7:20
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    Unfortunately, the correct use of these types of expressions must be memorized. While "happy-hour" is usually two to three hours in duration, "cocktail-hour" refers to a single hour. Both are time periods set aside for imbibing, but only "cocktail-hour" might be pluralized: "The caterer provides hot hors d'oeuvres during cocktail-hours," BUT, "The bar has free snacks during happy-hour." – Oldbag Apr 6 '15 at 9:55
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It's an expression that doesn't need a plural. Kind of the same way you don't call two banknotes or two coins "moneys". You should of course not use rush-hour to determine an exact point in time, such as "we'll meet after the rush-hour".

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