1

Humans spend much of their conscious lives interacting with the world through electronics, the only barrier between brain and machine …(1)… the senses — sight, sound and touch — through …(2)… humans and devices interface.

1- 1) being 2) is 3) to be 4) are

2- 1) which 2) those 3) those of which 4) them

in the above question, the correct answer is 1, but why "being" is correct? why "is" is not correct? Please justify the answer by explaining that.

In the second question, the correct answer is "which". Why "them is incorrect?

Please help me to find out these issues. and tell me some links to read more about. thank you.

closed as off-topic by Drew, Nick2253, ScotM, user66974, Ellie Kesselman Apr 4 '15 at 2:35

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  • I don't think grammar has a "point", other than as a container for semantic meaning. – Hot Licks Apr 1 '15 at 19:46
  • Are you sure? but i heard before about it. like Grammatical Structure i think we have Grammatical Point too. – user115688 Apr 1 '15 at 19:59
4

The words "being" and "which" tie the sentences together. You could rewrite your sentence like this:

From computers and scanners to multifarious mobile devices, an increasing number of humans spend much of their conscious lives interacting with the world through electronics. The only barrier between brain and machine is the senses — sight, sound and touch. Through them humans and devices interface.

Here I have divided your sentence into three independent parts, and in these cases "is" and "them" are correct.

The form "being" ties two sentences together. Here's another example:

He left the house. He saw that he was not welcome.

can be combined thus:

He left the house, seeing that he was not welcome.

Similarly, "which" ties two sentences together. Here's another example:

I saw a horse. It was brown.

can be combined thus:

I saw a horse, which was brown.

EDIT

Your additional question in the comments below concerns the subject of "seeing". If the subject of the two sentences which are combined is the same, it is only mentioned once. Thus:

He left the house. He saw that he was not welcome.

becomes

He left the house, seeing that he was not welcome. (Subject omitted.)

But

He left house. The building was on fire.

becomes

He left the house, the building being on fire. (Subject included because it is different from the subject in the first part of the sentence.)

By the way, "being" is not an infinitive, it is a present participle.

  • Thanks for your quick and precise answer. It helps me a lot. but 2 more question. is the meaning of “barrier” here is “link” or “obstacle”? and another question is that in your example “He left the house, seeing that he was not welcome.” the subject (He) is omitted and the verb replaced by an infinitive, but in my sentence, the subject (The only barrier between brain and machine) is not omitted! why this happened? – user115688 Apr 1 '15 at 19:05
  • "Barrier" is "obstacle" here (or perhaps more like "border"). I'll edit my reply above to answer the other part of your question. – oz1cz Apr 1 '15 at 19:20
  • How beautiful your answer is. Because lack of reputation, I could not vote up your answer yet, But I simply and honestly should thank you for helping me. – user115688 Apr 1 '15 at 19:41

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