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Is this sentence correct?

We will let you know when this option will be available.

Since this option is not available yet. It will be available soon.

So, is it correct to say:

We will let you know when this option will be available.

or

We will let you know when this option be available.

closed as off-topic by Hellion, Chenmunka, tchrist, Nick2253, ScotM Apr 2 '15 at 22:05

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    We will let you know when this option is available – Hemali Luhar Apr 1 '15 at 6:21
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because April Fools. – tchrist Apr 1 '15 at 21:32
9

Choice 1:

We will let you know when this option will be available.

Yes, it is a grammatically correct sentence.

Use the above sentence if your intention is that, at some point in the future, you will let the readers know the exact date the option will be available, (meaning the actual date of availability for that option is even further in the future).

A slightly modified alternative is to say:

We will let you know when this option will become available.


Choice 2:

We will let you know when this option is available.

Use this choice if, at a future date, you will let them know the option is available. In other words, when the option has become available, you will let them know at that time.


Choice 3:

We will let you know when this option be available.

This is grammatically incorrect. Do NOT use Choice 3.

Here's a usable alternative to Choice 3:

We will let you know when this option becomes available.

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    @AndySemyonov, even with my explanation you don't notice the difference between Choices 1 and 2? I do agree with you that Choice 2 sounds better, because Choice 1 sounds a bit redundant. But there is a slight technical difference. – Mike Apr 1 '15 at 8:47
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    @AndySemyonov, if you don't currently know the date the option will be available, but you will let users know the date it should become available when you figure out that date...what would you say? – Mike Apr 1 '15 at 8:51
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    @AndySemyonov, I mean, how would you tell them you will provide an estimated availability date for the option at some point in the future? – Mike Apr 1 '15 at 8:56
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    @AndySemyonov, you seem to miss the fact that it has a different meaning. – Mike Apr 1 '15 at 9:55
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    @AndySemyonov It’s not a matter of style or taste. The two versions have different meanings. Or rather, version 2 can in certain contexts (but not all) convey both meanings, whereas version 1 can only convey one of the meanings. “I’ll let you know tomorrow when I’m there” means specifically that I will be there tomorrow; “I’ll let you know tomorrow when I’ll be there” means that I will be there at some point after the time when I talk to you tomorrow—it could be that I won’t be there for another week. The sentences have completely different syntactic structures: in version 1, [cont’d-->] – Janus Bahs Jacquet Apr 1 '15 at 10:04
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Scenario 1:

Customer : I heard that Option A will be available soon. Could you look into your database and let me know when it will be available ?

Agent : Sure, my assistant here will access the database records. We will let you know when this option will be available.

Assistant (few seconds later) : It will be available starting on Friday.

Scenario 2:

Customer : I want to buy that Device as soon as Option A becomes available. Here is my contact number. Can you let me know when it becomes available ?

Agent : Sure, my assistant here will take your number. We will let you know when this option becomes available.

Assistant (few months later) : You wanted to know when Option A becomes available. We are happy to inform you that it is available now.


In Scenario 1, the information is already known, and the customer is asking for sharing that information. In Scenario 2, the information is not yet known, and the customer is asking to be informed as soon as it becomes known.


It is not meaningful to say "We will let you know when this option be available" which mixes up the tenses.

  • I like your two scenarios - they are good. But.... your explanation is wrong. In Scenario 1 the information is not yet known (by the Agent), and the Agent is saying "we will let you know the information when we have the information"; but (and this is key) when the information is given, it will be information on a future event. In Scenario 2 when the information is given, the event will be in the present. – AndyT Apr 1 '15 at 15:17
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    your comment still does not adequately explain the distinction. In either scenario the phrase "we will let you know" means "we will give you information in the future". The distinction is that in Scenario 1 the information will be "it will be available on this date", in Scenario 2 the information will be "it is available now". – AndyT Apr 1 '15 at 17:24
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    I found the Scenario 1 example compelling enough. But then re-read it, the sentence isn't working as it appears to be on first read. The agent is actually repeating the same words out of customer's mouth when they're saying 'when this option will be available.' It's not a case of a sentence with 2 clauses, a main and subordinating clause as it appears. I think one will notice if they're being meticulous. My conclusion is that such structures are only to be found where the speaker is answering by employing the interrogative sentence, which was used to inquire of them, as a declarative <cont.> – Andy Semyonov Apr 1 '15 at 17:49
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    @Prem The agent's response seems to suggest they're asked about the future availability of the option. You're certainly assuming that to be the customer's inquiry in your eg. and using it as it would be phrased in a question. Eg. May I know 'when this option will be available'? Yes I'll let you know 'when this option will be available'. I don't know if there's any term for it, but it's surely ready-made borrowing the phrase from an interrogative to make a declarative sentence. – Andy Semyonov Apr 1 '15 at 18:35
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    The two different answers could be given to the same initial question. Customer: "I really like Option A; can I have it please?". Agent option 1: "I'm really sorry, that's not available yet, and I don't have information on availability to hand. When I'm back in the office tomorrow, I will let you know when it will be available." Agent option 2: "I'm sorry, that's not available yet. I'll let you know when it's available." The distinction is not the question asked, the distinction is whether the Agent will know availability in advance of it actually being available. – AndyT Apr 2 '15 at 8:17

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