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This question already has an answer here:

Which of the two sentences given below is correct? If both of them are correct, which one is more grammatical?

  1. My answer to all these questions is "yes".

  2. My answer to all these questions is yes.

Should I use a capital 'y' in the first case?

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, Drew, tchrist, Jim, Mari-Lou A Mar 30 '15 at 5:03

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  • Punctuation has nothing to do with grammar. – tchrist Mar 27 '15 at 12:19
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    Answer/s given at Punctuating illustrating questions – Edwin Ashworth Mar 27 '15 at 12:29
  • @EdwinAshworth Thanks for your useful reference. Can I conclude that both of the sentences are correct? Isn't there more stress on my answer, that is yes of course, in the first sentence? – mok Mar 27 '15 at 12:40
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    (1a) Yes. (2) Yes, but I'd capitalise to add oomph. (1b) I'd use: My answer to all these questions is yes. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 27 '15 at 13:43
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There is "no such thing" as whether an expression is "grammatical or not".

Almost any expression is "grammatical" as long as it conforms to any form of grammar. Even pidgin English is "grammatical" if it conforms to a particular set of published or unpublished grammatical pattern.

The questions should be

  • is the expression grammatically acceptable
  • is the expression comprehensive
  • did the writer of the expression take efforts to define clear boundaries to avert confusion.

For example, which would be more comprehensive?

  • She said he was a pencil in a grinder.
  • She said he was a pencil-in-a-grinder.
  • She said he was a "pencil in a grinder".
  • She said he was a pencil in a grinder.
  • She said he was a [pencil in a grinder].

When it comes to expressions, English is mostly a pro-choice language. Does your choice put in sufficient effort to make your expression understood easily? You have the choice.

  • She told him no don't touch me you idiot.
  • She told him "no don't touch me you idiot".
  • She told him "No don't touch me you idiot".
  • She told him "No don't touch me, you idiot."
  • She told him "No! Don't touch me, you idiot."

Are you planning or deciding to ensure you are understood as you intended?

  • The answer to all the no questions was actually yes.
  • The answer to all the no-questions was actually "yes".
  • The answer to all the no-questions was actually "yes".
  • The Howitzer is the horse that won the derby.
  • The Howitzer is the horse that won the derby.

In the corporate world, efforts to make your communication distinct and easily understood are well appreciated. It is mostly your choice.

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