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In English possessive adjectives and reflexive pronouns are

  • I - My - Myself
  • You - Your - Yourself
  • He - His - Himself *
  • She - Her - Herself *
  • It - Its - Itself *
  • They (sing.) - Their - Themself *
  • We - Our - Ourselves
  • You (pl.) - Your - Yourselves
  • They - Their - Themselves *

Except for the starred ones, all reflexive pronouns are formed by combining possessive adjectives and the word "self". But starred ones are formed differently. They use objective pronouns. Why are the formations of these reflexive pronouns different?

marked as duplicate by Mari-Lou A, tchrist, Hellion, Community Mar 14 '15 at 17:50

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  • "herself" is not from the possessive ponoun "her"; it is from the OBJECTIVE pronoun "her". And "itself" is not from the possessive pronoun "its"; it is from the OBJECTIVE pronoun "it". – Brian Hitchcock Mar 14 '15 at 9:33
  • Have you visited English Language Learners ? – Kris Mar 14 '15 at 9:35
  • You've missed out gender-neutral third-person singular They - Their - Themself*. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 14 '15 at 9:38
  • @BrianHitchcock Thank you for noticing my mistakes. I edited my question. – jnbrq -Canberk Sönmez Mar 14 '15 at 10:08
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    First and second persons are always different from third in usage and type. First and second person are deictic, while third person is referential. It's common to find some structural difference between the two types in their morphology, too, since they change at different rates for different reasons, – John Lawler Mar 14 '15 at 13:57

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