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I wonder what is the general way to create a relative clause modifying a compound antecedent? For example:

This data is from many proof of concept environments and production environments that run XXX benchmark software.

Here the that is intent to refer to both "proof of concept environments and production environments". Will this expression cause ambiguity that that only refers to "production environments"?

Is the following sentence better than the preceding one?

This data is from many proof of concept environments and production environments, which run XXX benchmark software.

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You can avoid ambiguity by using "both of which." This should be preceded by a comma only if the relative clause is nonrestrictive, that is, if it means that all of such environments run XXX benchmark software. If only some of them run that software and you are restricting your statement only to those that do, do not use a comma.

On another matter, if this sentence appears in an article to be published in a technical journal or trade journal with conservative editors (like me), you might want to change the beginning of the sentence to "These data are . . ."

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