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The winner of the competition is the person who gets the cheese first, which is the prize.

closed as off-topic by Janus Bahs Jacquet, Ellie Kesselman, Marv Mills, Nicole, Centaurus Mar 13 '15 at 23:10

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  • try- The winner of the competition gets the cheese first which is the prize. – Manish Mar 11 '15 at 20:20
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    "There is no additional prize for the person who gets the cheese first." – Ian MacDonald Mar 11 '15 at 20:24
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    It's clumsy but probably "legal". – Hot Licks Mar 11 '15 at 21:35
  • Whoever first gets the cheese, which is also the prize, is the winner. (Just how I might rephrase it) – Mari-Lou A Mar 11 '15 at 22:17
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Yes it is just about grammatical. The reason I hesitate is that the word first gets in the way, between cheese and its relative pronoun which, making the whole thing a bit clumsy.

It would perhaps be better to say The winner is the first to get the cheese, which is the prize. That way it is perfectly grammatical.

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The relative clause should be immediately after the noun it modifies:

The winner of the competition is the person who gets the cheese, which is the prize, first.

See Grammar Bytes for a tutorial on the user of the relative clause.

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I will correct the sentence to make the relative clause after the noun:

The winner of the competition is the first person who gets the cheese, which is the prize.

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