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I am writing an analytical essay on a old story "Bright Phoenix" but there are a few sentences that I do not understand. What is the meaning of the quotes and what is it referring to?

  1. The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together.

  2. Come live with me and by my love; and we will all the pleasures prove.

  3. Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness.

  4. The people have always some champion whom they set over them and nurse into greatness…This and no other is the root from which a tyrant springs; when he first appears he is a protector.

  5. Though a man escape every other danger, he can never wholly escape those who do not want such a person as he is to exist.

closed as off-topic by Kris, Kristina Lopez, Nicole, FumbleFingers, TimLymington Mar 7 '15 at 12:25

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    The question is off topic on more than one count. Voting to close. – Kris Mar 6 '15 at 7:28
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1." The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together" is Isaiah 11:6 which is part of Isaiah Chapter 11 which contains 16 verses. The complete Isaiah 11:6 is " The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them."

Jewish exegesis differs from Christian exegesis regarding this verse from Hebrew bible.It refers to a a godly leader who will come, " that day", whose time will be of total peaceful co-existence between all living creatures.

2.This is a verse from The Passionate Shepherd to His Love, a poem written by the English poet Christopher Marlowe in the 1590s. " And we will all the pleasures prove" means we both will experience every pleasure the nature of the place I live in can offer.

3.This is a sentence from "To Autumn", a poem by English Romantic poet John Keats (1795 –1821). Mellow fruitfulness means pleasantly smooth abundance---Thus season of mists and mellow fruitfulness refers to time in a place of shadows of mist, tasty fruits and pleasing sounds and scenes.

4."The people have always some champion whom they set over them and nurse into greatness…This and no other is the root from which a tyrant springs; when he first appears he is a protector," a saying of Plato, The Republic, is absolutely true: a dictator becomes a dictator when people who appointed him make him feels he is their protector and nurse this feeling so he becomes great in his and people's eyes, something akin to Hitler and Germany after WW1.

5." Though a man escape every other danger, he can never wholly escape those who do not want such a person as he is to exist", a saying of Greek orator Demosthenes, means though a person may escape every other danger, he/she may not be able to escape those who want him/her dead---their plotting his death may succeeds.

Do forgive my misspellings and grammar errors!

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Here's what commentary I can come up with on your sentences:

  1. The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together.

More or less, this is a poetic way of saying that there will be peace (of the most total and satisfying kind). It is very nearly a direct quotation of Isaiah 11:6, which is part of a messianic prophecy.

  1. Come live with me and by my love; and we will all the pleasures prove.

This is a quote from a famous poem by Christopher Marlowe called "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love," which is more or less just what the title says: a shepherd inflamed with love begging a nymph to love him back. When the shepherd says "we will all the pleasures prove," he means that the pair will together find and explore every pleasure that can possibly be known.

  1. Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness.

The season of mist and mellow fruitfulness is autumn. Or, at least, John Keats seems to think so.

  1. The people have always some champion whom they set over them and nurse into greatness…This and no other is the root from which a tyrant springs; when he first appears he is a protector.

This is a quote found in book VIII of Plato's Republic (565c). It states an observation (or perhaps a warning) about the way dictators are born: they gain their power when people trust them as great protectors, and once they have their power, they become tyrants.

  1. Though a man escape every other danger, he can never wholly escape those who do not want such a person as he is to exist.

This last quote is attributed to Demosthenes' Speeches (19.228). It is a warning given in the context of a speech (a Philippic, I think, though I do not know it) on public life and leadership and the dangers that come with the more selfish motivations of men.

  • I was only allowed two links in the answer, but you can find Demosthenes' speech here, and the passage from The Republic here. – Tucker Sigourney Mar 6 '15 at 7:14

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