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I can't find the exact answer to the question of whether 'someone gets someone familiar with something' sounds correct and natural in English?

When I googled a while, I discovered that speakers of English said that when referring to a tour or a guide or training sessions. But I want to say that, for example, in the following context

A manager at work offered to get a new colleague familiar with the affairs of the company.

In my dictionary I also looked up other phrases with the same meaning.

make someone familiar;

have someone familiar.

Are they more suitable for this context? A talk in a loose manner or ambiguity is not appropriate here.

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    The normal, less colloquial form is familiarise someone with something. Of the less formal alternatives, I'd use 'make' or perhaps 'get'. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 4 '15 at 10:45
  • When I was a kid, I just took it for granted to follow people around me to use "get" as just another aux verb. But of course, as kid, I did not know they were called aux verbs. – Blessed Geek Mar 4 '15 at 10:50
  • @Blessed Geek Get is not used as an auxiliary here: there is no other verb present. This is a resultative construction. 'They got him drunk' cf 'They painted it red'. 'The man wiped the table clean' cf 'They got him involved' / 'They got him involved with the ebola victims'. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 4 '15 at 11:40
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    make is acceptable, although uncommon I think. have seems totally wrong, though. – Barmar Mar 4 '15 at 17:39
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    Yeah, that's about it. Sometimes you hear something like have someone become familiar. – Barmar Mar 5 '15 at 16:21
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As Edwin Ashworth notes in a comment above, it is less awkward (as well as being perfectly formal) to say

A manager at work offered to familiarize a new colleague with the company's affairs.

than to say

A manager at work offered to get [or make] a new colleague familiar with the affairs of the company.

Another option is to use the verb acquaint in place of familiarize:

A manager at work offered to acquaint a new colleague with the company's affairs.

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For general purposes, a better idea would be to use: "have (pronoun) familiarize himself." Not only does it achieve your goal without awkward phrasing, but it's less wordy. Example:

A manager at work offered to have a new colleague familiarize himself with the affairs of the company.

However, this sentence indicates that it is the said colleague familiarizing himself. So, for your purposes, you will most likely want to use:

A manager at work offered to help a new colleague familiarize himself with the affairs of the company.

Or, to be more formal,

A manager at work offered to assist a new colleague in familiarizing himself with the affairs of the company.

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