2

Examples:

Speaker A: I thought he wanted to know about insects.

Speaker B: But not [...] about them eating people!


After he finished his [...] about seals.

I think using fact doesn't imply "talking". Speech, is more like something you'd do in public. And story, I think people usually associate them with fictitious accounts?

What's a better alternative?

  • In your first example, you don’t need any noun. “But not about them eating people!” works just fine. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Mar 3 '15 at 15:39
5

How about talk (the free dictionary):

    n

    18. a speech or lecture: a talk on ancient Rome.
    19. an exchange of ideas or thoughts: 
a business talk with a colleague.
    20. idle chatter, gossip, or rumour: 
there has been a lot of talk about you two.
    21. a subject of conversation; theme: 
our talk was of war.
    22. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (often plural)
 a conference, discussion, or negotiation: talks about a settlement.
    23. a specific manner of speaking: children's talk.

So we may say:

Speaker A: I thought he wanted to know about insects.

Speaker B: But not a talk about them eating people!

After he finished his talk about seals.

3

Sojourner's solution a talk is perhaps the one I would choose but there are a few other options available.

Depending on how ironic, shocked or surprised "Speaker B" is, the following terms can be used:

Speaker A: I thought he wanted to know about insects.

Speaker B: But not a spiel about them eating people!

After he finished his spiel about seals.

Merriam-Webster also defines spiel as to talk volubly or extravagantly

If Speaker B is speaking sarcastically, or the OP wants to emphasize the depth and detail of Speaker's A description:

Speaker A: I thought he wanted to know about insects.

Speaker B: But not a PowerPoint presentation about them eating people!

A more serious alternative to PPP would be demonstration

demonstration
An act of showing that something exists or is true by giving proof or evidence: - acts of faith are not capable of mathematical demonstration

2

Since you are talking about specific facts/characteristics I think:

description: may fit in the context:

  • a statement or account that describes; representation in words
  • But not a description about eating people.
  • After he finished his description about seals.
2

"Anecdote", perhaps?

"But not an anecdote about them eating people."

"After he finished his anecdote about seals..."

I use "anecdote" when describing someone in "story-telling mode". An anecdote is "one-way" - from the speaker to the audience. An anecdote can be told during a speech, in an informal group, or when talking informally with one other person:

"The speaker told a humorous anecdote about his lost luggage." "Mark told me an interested anecdote about seeing whales while in Hawaii."

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/anecdote

0

But not a discourse about them eating people!

After he finished his spiel about seals.

But not an account of them eating people!

After he finished waxing poetic about seals.

But not a diatribe about them eating people!

After he finished his discourse about seals.

But not a chat about them eating people!

After he finished his A to Z about seals.

But not a contribution about them eating people!

After he finished giving his two cents about seals.

But not a monologue about them eating people!

After he finished giving his point of view about seals.

But not a story about them eating people!

After he finished his exposition about seals.

But not his ideas about them eating people!

After he finished developing his ideas about seals.

One more: megilla.

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