1

What is common to all these types of services is that the process of their delivery is subject to our internal control of quality.

I am not sure about the sentence structure indicated above. I wonder whether this structure is unusual for native speakers of English? Google does not clear up this question.

Here I am speaking about the common feature of the services.

  • It's grammatical, but very complex. It's a Wh-cleft construction related to [That the process of their delivery is subject to our internal control of quality] is common to all these types of services. The bracketed portion is a tensed subject complement clause, which is the subject of is common. This is already too complex to parse easily, and applying the Wh-cleft rule usually is an attempt to clarify. I wouldn't say it was clarified much, though. If it's important, use shorter sentences and phrases (e.g, quality control) and don't be afraid to repeat yourself. – John Lawler Feb 28 '15 at 18:30
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It reads like corporate-speak [all it really means is 'we don't screw up'] but grammatically it's absolutely fine.

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I am not a native speakers of English I am afraid. I, however, will write " what is common to all these types of services is that the process of their delivery is subject to our internal quality control ."

Or

" What is common to all these types of services is their delivery is subject to our internal quality control ."

0

What is unusual about this sentence and those like it is that they are verbose and jargon-ridden. There is, however, nothing wrong with the grammar.

  • 1
    Nor is being verbose and jargon-ridden an unusual feature. Most written English is verbose and jargon-ridden. – John Lawler Feb 28 '15 at 18:23
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You could try re-phrasing it to see what it means:

The common feature of these services is they are governed by our internal quality controls.

which proves that nine of the words in your original sentence are redundant.

  • But it is important to emphasize that when the services are rendered they are subject to quality control at the same time. Control is exercised in the process of rendering the services. – user109460 Feb 28 '15 at 17:59
  • @Amandedouce: You can't expect one sentence to give facts and emphasis both. If you want to emphasize something, put it in a different sentence instead of trusting in implication or presupposition. – John Lawler Feb 28 '15 at 18:25

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