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I am trying to say that because the powerful keep making themselves more powerful, it is hard for powerless to rise above their powerlessness. This is HOW I originally wrote it:

Those with power use it to benefit them and make themselves more powerful; whereas, those without power have a hard time rising above their powerlessness.

I want to replace "whereas" with "due to which" (because what I have written after "whereas" is the result of what I have written BEFORE "whereas") but it doesn't make sense to use "which".

I hope my question is not too confusing. I am just looking for a grammatically correct way of writing down my thought.

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If you're intending to explicitly convey that the second part of your sentence is a consequence of the first, I'd suggest you use the very common word therefore, which has exactly that meaning and is often used when the consequence is a longer phrase or sentence:

those with power use it to benefit them and make themselves more powerful; therefore, those without power have a hard time rising above their powerlessness.

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I see no problem with “due to which” So the sentence could run as:

those with power use it to benefit them and make themselves more powerful; due to which those without power have a hard time rising above their powerlessness.

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