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What does "ceremonial" mean in this context?

Thus, it was for freedom (legitimate moral and ceremonial freedom) that Christ set us free.

Definitions of "ceremonial":

1. relating to or used for formal events of a religious or public nature.
2. (of a position or role) involving only nominal authority or power.

From the book "Old Covenant, New Covenant: The Case Against Legalism" By Jesse Acuff

https://books.google.com/books?id=2zuHs1gkyEYC&pg=PA190&lpg=PA190&dq=%22ceremonial+freedom%22&source=bl&ots=_BBCyDPygC&sig=9KmObBczx874bENcuUFD-ntPDoA&hl=en&sa=X&ei=NkfpVMTQD4HtggSqsYKwCQ&ved=0CEQQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=%22ceremonial%20freedom%22&f=false

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    I think you might have to ask the author. But if I had to guess I'd say he's talking about the "ceremonial" aspects of Judaism -- observing "kosher", etc. – Hot Licks Feb 22 '15 at 4:17
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Thus, it was for freedom (legitimate moral and ceremonial freedom) that Christ set us free.

It seems the author quoted was paraphrasing Galatians 5:1 of the New Testament:

It is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Stand firm, then, and do not let yourselves to be burdened again by a yoke of slavery.

In the larger context, the author refined his meaning with a specific reference:

the moral and ceremonial liabilities of the Law of Moses.

He also referred to Acts 15, which discusses an ancient theological dispute about circumcision, the fundamental ceremony of Judaism:

Certain people came down from Judea to Antioch and were teaching the believers: “Unless you are circumcised, according to the custom taught by Moses, you cannot be saved.” [extensive discussion omitted]... Now then, why do you try to test God by putting on the necks of Gentiles a yoke that neither we nor our ancestors have been able to bear?

Emphasis mine

This discussion seems to be consistent with the larger context of Galatians 5:1

Mark my words! I, Paul, tell you that if you let yourselves be circumcised, Christ will be of no value to you at all.

Emphasis mine

The nature of this ceremonial freedom is a question of theology rather than language, but it seems quite clear that the author of Old Covenant, New Covenant refers to a New Testament notion of freedom from the ceremonial requirement of circumcision, which is at the center of Old Testament Judaism.

Conclusion:

The author's definition appears to be:

  1. relating to or used for formal events of a religious or public nature.

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