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There is a kind of complex sentences where the first subsentence has the same verb as in the second one. So logicaly the verb could be ommited in the second one. What would be the correct punctuation in this case. Here is the original sentence:

The first one contains the score the second one contains the name.

And the sentence without second verb:

The first one contains the score the second one the name.

(All punctuation marks are ommited)

  • The first one contains score; the second one contains name. (Light punctuators would probably accept a comma here). // The first one contains score; the second one, name. (I assume there is a reason for the strange-sounding lack of articles / other determiners.) – Edwin Ashworth Feb 20 '15 at 7:48
  • Had a reference in mind for my answer, but couldn't find it. Edwin's suggestion above seems to be most appropriate sans my reference. – Funktr0n Feb 20 '15 at 9:09
  • @Funktron, maybe you're thinking of "To err is human, to forgive divine"? [Should there be a comma after 'forgive'?] – David Garner Feb 20 '15 at 9:21
  • If you wanted to be even clearer, you could highlight the words e.g. The first one contains 'score', the second one contains 'name'. – Ronan Feb 20 '15 at 9:33
  • Don't you need articles here? "The first one contains the score, the second one, the name." – Peter Shor Feb 20 '15 at 12:03
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The first version is like this:

The first one contains the score; the second one contains the name.

For the second version there are two possibilities:

The first one contains the score, the second one the name.

The first one contains the score; the second one, the name.

This kind of construction has two names: zeugma (ZOYG-muh) and syllepsis (sill-EPP-siss). The two have overlapping and shifting definitions depending on whom you talk to. For me a zeugma is a case like you've proposed, and a syllepsis is a case in which the verb is used differently each time, e.g. "Dost sometimes Counsel take – and sometimes Tea" (Pope, The Rape of the Lock). But if you ask other people they might say it's the other way around, or that both are zeugmas, or that zeugma and syllepsis mean the same thing. Most commonly, though, at least the kind of case you're talking about is called a zeugma.

  • @JoelDefner, but "Dost sometimes Counsel take – and sometimes Tea" has another punctuation comparing to what you proposed. Why? – Ivan Gerasimenko Feb 26 '15 at 7:06
  • A matter of style. Apparently the author felt the two parts needed a larger pause between them than a semicolon would provide. A dramatic pause, if you will. Most punctuation is, after all, an attempt to represent speech patterns in print, so usage will vary. (and this was a poem from 300 years ago) – Brian Hitchcock Feb 26 '15 at 11:00

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