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What is the correct pronoun for this sentence "Erica went to get them from the bakery" or is it already correct?

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    One would need to know what Erica went to get. – Hot Licks Feb 19 '15 at 23:00
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Me You Him/Her/It Us Them

They are all grammatically valid, but it depends on what Erica went to get.

  • Because I downvote answers that are ripoffs of comments, with about no original thought or content added. – pazzo Feb 20 '15 at 2:57
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In order to verify the correctness of this sentence, we need to know what Erica went to get.


Example 1:

Erica wants a loaf of bread, which is sold in the bakery.

The correct pronoun is it, as the loaf of bread is a single item (singular).

"We wanted a loaf of bread and Erica went to get it from the bakery"


Example 2:

Erica wants some bread rolls, which are sold in the bakery.

The correct pronoun is them, as the rolls are multiple items (plural).

"For the burgers, we needed some bread rolls, and Erica went to get them from the bakery"


Example 3:

Erica wants to collect her children, who are waiting in the bakery.

The correct pronoun is them, as she has multiple children (plural), and does not change if they are all boys or all girls.

"Erica's children were waiting in the bakery, and she went there to collect them"

Notes:

  • collect sounds better than get for people
  • there is used because the bakery has already been referred to
  • she is used because Erica has already been mentioned

Examples 4 & 5:

[Using the same structure as example 3]

Erica wants to collect her boy/girl, who is waiting in the bakery.

The correct pronoun is either him (boy) or her (girl), as she has a single child (singular)

"Sarah (Erica's daughter) was waiting in the bakery, and Erica went there to collect her"

or

"James (Erica's son) was waiting in the bakery, and Erica went there to collect him"


Example 6 & 7:

Erica wants to collect me or collect me and some other people, and I/we am/are waiting in the bakery for her.

The pronouns are either me for I or us for we

"I was waiting in the bakery, and Erica came to collect me"

or

"We were waiting in the bakery, and Erica came to collect us"

Notes:

  • use of came instead of went there because it sounds better when saying it from your own point of view - you are there in person

Alternative to examples 4-7

"Erica's children were waiting in the bakery for her to [come and] collect them"

"Sarah was waiting in the bakery for Erica to [come and] collect her"

"James was waiting in the bakery for Erica to [come and] collect him"

"I was waiting in the bakery for Erica to [come and] collect me"

"We were waiting in the bakery for Erica to [come and] collect us"

This is probably the best way of saying it, because the referred people know that Erica is going to come and collect them and were waiting for her to do that.


Example 8:

Very rare; this would probably be used for someone who had forgotten what had happened.

"You were [waiting] in the bakery and Erica came to collect you"

Notes:

  • the potential omission of 'waiting' because the person was not intending for Erica to come and collect them

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