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I need an adjective which means both "Specific" and "General" simultaneously!

As the explanation, the "adjective" is supposed to be used in scientific domain. The adjective would describes a "model" representing a group of data instances so that the model is:

1) "specific" enough to distinguish the group from other groups.

2) "general" enough to capture all shared commonalities of its included instances.

So, the model is a "??????" model!

As an example for the word that I mean:

Consider we have resume (list of abilities) of 5 people (call theme A-E) like this:

A,B:[Programming, Speaking Dutch Language, Playing Guitar]

C:[Programming, Team Working, Speaking Dutch Language]

E,F:[Team Working, Speaking Dutch Language].

The A, B and C form the group X together and C, D and E form another group, say Y. We want to find a ``specific'' list of abilities for group X which contain common abilities of its members. So, a "general" and "specific" list would contain "Programming" but not "Dutch Language". Since "Dutch language" although is a share ability among A,B and C, it is a share ability between the members group Y. The adjective that I need should describe the [Programming] as the list of abilities (as the model of) group X, which is just describe the group X (not other group) -specified- and also describe share property of its members -generalised-.

I hope this example would help!

closed as unclear what you're asking by Edwin Ashworth, Misti, Robusto, tchrist, RegDwigнt Feb 17 '15 at 14:20

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Inventing a new word would also be nice if somebody has any idea :) – Mostafa Dehghani Feb 17 '15 at 10:00
  • Can you translate it into an everyday setting, using everyday objects like knives and forks? Perhaps blue pens, red pens and yellow pens; or jelly babies or something? – WS2 Feb 17 '15 at 10:19
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    Isn't this basically implied in the concept of a model itself? – Janus Bahs Jacquet Feb 17 '15 at 10:26
  • @WS2: Actually it's hard to explain :) Consider we have resume of 5 people (call theme A-E) like this: / A,B:[Programming, Dutch Language] / C:[Programming, Team Working, Dutch Language] / E,F:[Team Working, Dutch Language]. The A, B and C form a group X together and C, D and E form another group, say Y. We want to find a specific resume for group X which contain common abilities of its members. So, a "general" and "specific" resume would contain "Programming" but not "Dutch Language". Since "Dutch language" although is a share ability among A,B,C; it also is a share ability in group Y. – Mostafa Dehghani Feb 17 '15 at 10:54
  • @MostafaDehghani So I've got five widgets A to E. A & B are red and yellow; C is red, yellow, and blue; D & E are blue and yellow. Now what is it we need to describe? – WS2 Feb 17 '15 at 11:11
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Prototypical seems like an appropriate adjective:

adjective: having the typical qualities of a particular group or kind of person or thing : very typical

The etymology implies a specific pattern in a general class:

c.1600, from French prototype (16c.) and directly from Medieval Latin prototypus "original, primitive,"

from Greek prototypon "a first or primitive form," noun use of neuter singular of prototypos "original, primitive,"

from protos "first" (see proto-) + typos "impression, mold, pattern" (see type (n.)). In English from 1590s as prototypon.

Emphasis mine


www.merriam-webster.com

www.etymonline.com

  • Thank you, @Andrew Leach, I'd like to learn how you did that :-) – ScotM Feb 17 '15 at 10:25
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    Four spaces at the start of a line turns on code-formatting. I removed a space. – Andrew Leach Feb 17 '15 at 10:27
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    or archetypical – ottodidakt Feb 17 '15 at 13:29
3

Perhaps a goldilocks model

[AS MODIFIER] Denoting or referring to the most desirable or advantageous part of a range of values or conditions (typically the center):

the planet is in the middle of what astronomers call the Goldilocks zone: a place that’s not too hot and not too cold

he promises us a return to the Goldilocks economy—not too much deflation, not too much inflation

Oxford Dictionaries Online

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