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I have come across this following sentence but I could not figure out the highlighted part of its structure.

In the next session of parliament, the government will introduce new laws aimed at stopping domestic violence.

For me it should be :

'In the next session of parliament, the government will introduce new laws (which are ) aiming at stopping domestic violence.'

I feel that there seems to be reduced relative clause after the word laws which is subject of it.On the other hand I think the new laws cannot 'aim at' by itself, is it 'a passive reduced relative clause' ,if there is something like that?

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    'In the next session of parliament, the government will introduce new laws (which will be) aimed [targeted] at stopping domestic violence.' – Edwin Ashworth Feb 17 '15 at 1:23
  • Both forms of the verbal phrase modify laws with a metaphorical use of aim, indicating the purpose of the laws. The relative (which are) can be implied in both constructions. Aiming establishes a progressive view of the aim. – ScotM Feb 17 '15 at 1:24
  • It's fine as written. "Aimed at", in that context, means "with the intended purpose of". – Hot Licks Feb 17 '15 at 1:56
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    Preferring fewer words, I suggest "In the next session of parliament, the government will introduce new laws to stop domestic violence." If you really must, I suppose you could add the word "designed" before the infinitive "to stop." – rhetorician Feb 17 '15 at 1:59
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    This question is off-topic because it's a NARQ. – Kris Feb 17 '15 at 6:51
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The original and your rewrite express different agents.

In the original somebody (presumably the government) aims the laws at a target, as you might aim a rifle; The clause expresses the government's intention to stop domestic violence by means of the laws.

In your rewrite the laws are anthropomorphized, treated as themselves capable of aiming at a goal. The clause expresses the laws' intention; the government is merely the force which sets the laws into operation.

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