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Is there any specific word to describe walking the same path from one place to other. For e.g, 1 Km line, where someone walks from one end and turns back, goes to other end & Keeps repeating it.

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    For a shorter length (eg, walking back and forth in a room) it would be "pacing" -- "He paced back and forth while he waited." – Hot Licks Feb 16 '15 at 12:27
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'to and fro' is good enough - http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/to-and-fro - in one direction and then in the opposite direction

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Back and forth is another common expression:

  • in one direction and then the other repeatedly; from one place to another repeatedly.

    • The tiger paced back and forth in its cage.
  • if someone or something moves back and forth between two places, they move from one place to the other place again and again.

    • Nurses went back and forth among the wounded, bringing food and medicine.

(TFD)

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You might say a person doing this is shuttling between points. A shuttle bus or shuttle flight is one that repeatedly retraces the same route

  • This is very much suitable to what I need. – Dhaval Feb 16 '15 at 18:52
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PACER noun: 1. one that paces; specifically : a horse whose predominant gait is the pace.

from Merriam-Webster Dictionary online

or,

PACE verb gerund or present participle: pacing

walk at a steady and consistent speed, especially back and forth and as an expression of one's anxiety or annoyance.

from Google link

  • That's the wrong definition. – Hot Licks Feb 16 '15 at 12:28
  • well, enlighten me then. – user98990 Feb 16 '15 at 12:31
  • Start with the verb "pace". Has nothing to do with gait. – Hot Licks Feb 16 '15 at 12:32
  • @Hot Licks - all other answers, and your comment, describe a person's actions. I, on the other hand, answered OP's literal question, "describe a person ..." – user98990 Feb 16 '15 at 12:38
  • Well, my question probably seems ambiguous. But, I didn't ask the word for a person. – Dhaval Feb 16 '15 at 12:50

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