3

Is there a specific term for these kinds of words that describe the quality of a particular act or object? Besides adjective?

Examples:

  • Perfect
  • Excellent
  • Great
  • Good
  • Bad
  • Poor
  • Terrible
  • Horrible
  • You are looking for something that describes only positive attributes? If not, what is missing in adjectives? – oerkelens Feb 9 '15 at 20:46
  • @oerkelens Is there a specific name for these particular attributes? The ones that describe a condition of something. – yuritsuki Feb 9 '15 at 20:47
  • Perhaps you're looking for intensifier? If so, I would caution you that not all adjectives are intensifiers. – Robusto Feb 9 '15 at 20:54
  • Which particular attributes? Good ones, or do you also want to include "bad", "terrible", etc? – oerkelens Feb 9 '15 at 20:56
  • 1
    Three roles for the types of modification achieved using adjectives have been suggested: identifiers, classifiers and descriptors. These above are most probably descriptive usages. They may be subdivided into adjectives describing size / weight / temperature / humidity / age / shape / color / materials ... These above ascribe worth / value to the referent, so they are evaluative. – Edwin Ashworth Feb 9 '15 at 21:03
2

Assuming that your question is about words that describe points along a scale of desirability, I would call them ratings.

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4

These are called "superlatives" in the positive sense.

In the negative sense, they could be considered "shades (or levels) of mediocrities".

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  • 5
    Grammatically the word "superlative" is usually reserved for the most extreme of three adjectives formed from the same root (the midde one is called the " comparative"). So: tall, taller (comparative), tallest (superlative). Short,shorter,shortest. Some have non-standard forms: good, better, best; bad, worse, worst. So none of the OP's examples are superlatives. – Brian Hitchcock Feb 10 '15 at 8:41
  • @BrianHitchcock: actually, perfect is a superlative, albeit borrowed from Latin: bonus, melior, perfectus. That is why some people fuss over more perfect and the likes. – oerkelens Feb 10 '15 at 21:52
  • Yes, I suppose I would fuss over " mote perfect" as well. Good Latin lesson. Now I know why I couldn't think of the English adjective or its comparative for which "perfect" is the superlative. Super-ameliorated Bonus! – Brian Hitchcock Feb 11 '15 at 5:51
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    @BrianHitchcock You could even call it perfectly ameliorated bonus and get all three terms in one go. – Justin Greer Feb 11 '15 at 23:22
-3

How about calling them Superlatives.

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  • 3
    Grammatically the word "superlative" is usually reserved for the most extreme of three adjectives formed from the same root (the midde one is called the " comparative"). So: tall, taller (comparative), tallest (superlative). Short,shorter,shortest. Some have non-standard forms: good, better, best; bad, worse, worst. So none of the OP's examples are superlatives. – Brian Hitchcock Feb 10 '15 at 8:38

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