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I wanted to ask a lot of questions concerning this phrase:

I always consult with my children who are affected by the decisions to be made.

  • What role does the particle "to" perform in this phrase? Whether "to" simply accompanies the infinitive, or has also another grammatical role?
  • What role does the principal verb perform in relation to "to be made"?
  • What does "to be + past participle" mean excluding from the explanation the role of the constructions "going to be + pp" and "used to be + pp"? If there are, what are the various meanings of "to be + pp"?
  • I won't attempt to answer your question. I will, however, suggest you change the syntax and grammar of the sentence somewhat. Here's one option: "I always consult with my children who are going to be affected by the decisions I need to make." Or, "I always consult my children when I need to make a decision which will affect them." To be even more specific, just in case the mom or dad has children who are too young to be consulted (or are out of the picture), you could say "I always consult those of my children [or 'the oldest two'] who are going to be affected by a decision I make." – rhetorician Feb 6 '15 at 19:39
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I always consult with my children who are affected by the decisions to be made.

  1. To marks the passive infinitive phrase to be made.

I always consult with my children who are affected by the decisions to be made.

  1. The principle verb consult has a relatively distant relationship with the infinitive phrase to be made, which modifies decisions.

    Decisions is the agent of the passive verb are affected in the relative clause who are affected by the decisions to be made,

    The relative clause modifies children in the prepositional phrase with my children,

    The prepositional phrase with my children modifies consult.

I always consult with my children who are affected by the decisions to be made.

  1. The construction to be + the past participle is a passive infinitive.

Definition:

An infinitive construction in which the agent (or performer of the action) either appears in a prepositional phrase following the verb or is not identified at all.

The passive infinitive is made up of the marker to + be + a past participle (also known as the -en form):

"The case is to be decided by a judge."

0

I think it only accompanies the infinitive:

  • "I am to be home by eleven." ([It is expected of me that I will be/I have to be/I must be] home by eleven)

  • "I am to drive there." ([It is expected of me that I/I have to/I must] drive there)

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