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Lets say I have the following sentences...

Cake is really bad for you. It contains a large amount of sugar. It contains common allergens. It looks silly.

Additionally, lets say I wanted to connect all three of these thoughts together in a similar manner...

Cake is really bad for you. It contains a large amount of sugar. It contains common allergens. And, it looks silly.

Now, I know that using an "And" at the beginning of the sentence is poor grammar. I also realize this is more of a paragraph structure, so I could do some word-smithing to make it work that way.

However, this feels a lot like a series of items, and I would really love to treat it as such...

Cake is really bad for you: it contains a large amount of sugar; it contains common allergens; and it looks silly.

Is there a structure in the English language that provides for this? Is the above the proper usage?

Thanks!

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I would use a dash and commas to separate each of the explanatory thoughts. Removing the redundant pronouns and verbs makes it even cleaner.

Cake is really bad for you - it contains a large amount of sugar, common allergens, and looks silly.

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    Tvanfosson, that's a good suggestion, but it lacks parallelism. Also, I would use a colon instead of a dash since the second clause explains the first clause. My suggestion would be this: Cake is really bad for you: it not only looks silly, but also contains a large amount of sugar and common allergens. – Fred Bailey Feb 4 '15 at 7:13

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