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Can I insert a comma in this sentence like this:

"Consequently, the type of the vehicle they are using can be specified as well as if they are walking or stationary somewhere."

Or is the sentence better without it:

"Consequently the type of the vehicle they are using can be specified as well as if they are walking or stationary somewhere."

marked as duplicate by Matt E. Эллен Feb 5 '15 at 10:12

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  • Well, the first is a definite no-go. The second is a little better. – Hot Licks Feb 2 '15 at 23:57
  • Keep the commas after consequently and before as well as – Barmar Feb 2 '15 at 23:59
  • And you absolutely must get rid of the one after "vehicle". It is totally out of place and destroys the sense of the phrase. – Brian Hitchcock Feb 3 '15 at 0:21
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I would write:

Consequently, the type of vehicle they are using can be specified, as well as whether they are walking or stationary somewhere.

The commas aren't technically required, but they help the reader see the structure of the sentence. When a sentence has a number of subordinate clauses, this is usually a good idea to make it easier to read.

And whether tends to be a better word than if when stating alternate options.

  • For consistency with "walking", I wouldn't use just "stationary". I would prefer "...whether they are walking or staying stationary somewhere." – Nick2253 Feb 3 '15 at 0:10
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    I don't think that's necessary. walking is a gerund that can be used in parallel with an adjective. – Barmar Feb 3 '15 at 0:11
  • As another example, you can say whether they are moving or stopped. – Barmar Feb 3 '15 at 0:12
  • Their mere existence implies that they have a location, so the 'somewhere' is superfluous. – Erik Kowal Feb 3 '15 at 6:14

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