2

This question already has an answer here:

Reading the news last week one sentence jumped out at me and has been bothering me since:

When Tommy Thompson and his longtime companion did leave the hotel room, usually alone and her more than him, they would use a combination of buses, taxis and walking around to shake anyone who might be tailing them.

Original article, second paragraph, here: Link to CBC

HER left the hotel more than HIM?

While her more than him is certainly used - especially in N.America - more often than she more than he, surely she/he here is actually correct?

I've searched Google for "he/she vs her/him" and found many pages discussing this but nothing which will definitively set my mind at ease.

marked as duplicate by Janus Bahs Jacquet, oerkelens, Andrew Leach Feb 2 '15 at 13:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1

I believe it's a separate clause, instead of expanding the sentence out as:

When Tommy Thompson and his longtime companion did leave the hotel room, usually alone and her left the hotel more than him, they would use a combination of buses

Think of it as:

When Tommy Thompson and his longtime companion did leave the hotel room, they would use a combination of buses. Usually alone and her more than him.

This is a verbless clause, which means it shouldn't have a subject (he/she).

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.