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There is a sentence like "I saw him at home."

What is the meaning of the sentence? 1. I saw that he is at home. 2. At the house, I saw him. 3. I saw that he felt good.

What is the collect meaning of the sentence above? Or Three of them is possible?

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    Normally it would be interpreted to mean that you went to his house and spoke to him. Other interpretations are possible, but would require significant contextual clues to identify them as different from this idiomatic interpretation.
    – Hot Licks
    Commented Feb 2, 2015 at 13:14

2 Answers 2

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Without further context, "I saw him at home" could mean any of these things:

I met with him at his home.

I met with him him at my home.

I saw that he was at his home.

I don't think your last possibility ("feeling comfortable") is very likely at all, because we would normally say something like "He seemed at home to me" if we wanted to express that idea.

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  • You've covered most of it. The surgical possibility is probably not intended. Commented Feb 2, 2015 at 17:14
  • @Edwin Ashworth: Or the magical possibility.
    – TimR
    Commented Feb 2, 2015 at 22:44
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Although number one and two could mean "I saw him at home" sentence two may imply that you were physically at his home when you saw him, which is an implication your original sentence did not have.

For example, you could have seen him from across a park, or further down the street. In this case "I saw him at home" and "I saw that he is home" purely imply that the male is was at home, and you saw him.

"At the house, I saw him" may imply that not only was he at home, and that you saw him, but you were there too because in this case the "at the house" is referring to where you were, not him.

So with detonative and connotative meanings in mind, I would suggest "I saw that he is at home" is the closest match to "I saw him at home."

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