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I was having an argument with someone, and I showed them a piece of clear evidence and now they're just making things up because they've given up.

They keep saying things such as

"Funny, I thought you were the only genius in existence. You should be able to understand everything in the universe, especially the base thoughts of us lowly plebians, who cower in your vast and superior intellect."

and

"Of course I, and all of Earth's other inhabitants are full of s**t. What are we thinking, in defying Earth's greatest, and superiorly intellectual ruler? How dare we question the supreme infallibililty of Earth's sole living braniac? What was I thinking indeed? Oh guide us, great savior, guide us! GUIDE US, MASTER!!!!"

and again...

"Yes, oh brilliant Master! What other orders do you have for us, lowly, insignificant ants?!"

It's getting really annoying, and it's incredibly childish. He's being sarcastic and making incredibly exaggerated things up because he "lost" the argument, as you can see.

Is there a word for this? A word for someone who just sarcastically says you know everything and the like?

closed as primarily opinion-based by ermanen, tchrist, Edwin Ashworth, anongoodnurse, Drew Jan 26 '15 at 4:02

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    Sarcastic sycophancy. – Martin Krzywinski Jan 23 '15 at 21:10
  • 1
    What about caustic remark? – Misti Jan 23 '15 at 21:42
  • 1
    I think that's called a "PITA". – Hot Licks Jan 23 '15 at 21:58
  • 2
    A word for the person or the activity? – Good A.M. Jan 24 '15 at 0:29
  • They seem to be employing their sarcasm for argumentum ad hominem, a fallacy of irrelevance. – Patrick M Jan 24 '15 at 3:00
11

A word for someone who sarcastically exaggerates your superiority?

The best moniker was suggested by what Brian offered:

Mocker

NOUN

A person who mocks someone or something:

from mock

VERB

[WITH OBJECT] 1.0 Tease or laugh at in a scornful or contemptuous manner:

1.1 Make (something) seem laughably unreal or impossible:

1.2 Mimic (someone or something) scornfully or contemptuously:

This person misrepresents your success in an argument as absurd pride and arrogance. He also holds you up to the contempt of an an absurd standard because of your success:

Related to mockery

NOUN (plural mockeries)

[MASS NOUN] 1.0 Teasing and contemptuous language or behavior directed at a particular person or thing:

1.1 [IN SINGULAR] An absurd misrepresentation or imitation of something:

My favorite descriptor:

Fool

NOUN

1.0 A person who acts unwisely or imprudently; a silly person:


Free advice with a linguistic twist!

If you let him persist in this childish behavior, he could do a lot of damage to you and to the people around you. Two consecutive Proverbs of Solomon suggest a fun word game to use his linguistic devises in your favor:

Do not answer a fool according to his folly, or you yourself will be just like him.

Answer a fool according to his folly, or he will be wise in his own eyes.

Once you've confirmed that you haven't been secretly rubbing your victory in (which would make you the aggressor and ruin the game), you can run hot and cold water on him with two complementary responses:

1. Show him how silly he really is by playing along:

"Yes, oh brilliant Master! What other orders do you have for us, lowly, insignificant ants?!"

No, my supercilious neophyte, you are too insignificant to receive orders from the great and mighty Master! I shall step on you now; assume the position.

In this response, he becomes the clown of your royal court:

2.0 historical A jester or clown, especially one retained in a royal or noble household.

2. Show him how silly he really is by rising above it:

"Funny, I thought you were the only genius in existence. You should be able to understand everything in the universe, especially the base thoughts of us lowly plebians, who cower in your vast and superior intellect."

Well, I'm not the genius you think I am, I stumbled onto a good argument by sheer luck. I'm sorry I made you feel inferior.

In this response, he becomes the nobleman visiting your rightful realm. Then you return to the play-along mode:

1. Show him how silly he really is by playing along:

"Of course I, and all of Earth's other inhabitants are full of s--t.

Feculence is too precious for your worthless frame. The others are fine, my child.

Not for a moment, should you let him drag others into your good humored irony. Turn off the hot water, and turn on the cold again:

2. Show him how silly he really is by rising above it:

What are we thinking, in defying Earth's greatest, and superiorly intellectual ruler?

Hold on a minute, friend; your ideas are just fine! In fact, some of my best ideas come to me while I am thinking about your ideas. I think we all add value to each other.

Don't forget to pat everyone else on the back too! By going back and forth between a farcical fusion and a earnest engagement, you keep him off guard. He never knows what to expect:

1. Show him how silly he really is by playing along:

How dare we question the supreme infallibility of Earth's sole living braniac? What was I thinking indeed?

This impudence arises from your singular stupidity, Luke; I am your Father! I long to embrace you in the Force!

Eventually, he will notice that you are alternating, and then you hit him with the double dose of his own medicine:

Oh guide us, great savior, guide us! GUIDE US, MASTER!!!!"

Snatch the mung from my mizzen, grasshopper, and it will become time for you to perceive my glorious path.

If you demonstrate sincere fun while you're playing along, and sincere camaraderie when you are rising above it, his mockery will eventually turn on him as what it really is:

1.2 archaic Ludicrously futile action:

Don't forget: you have to make sure you start this game of words on the moral high ground. If you despise him in any way, it won't work!

After those two nouns, a few adjectives seem appropriate to describe him:

Derisive

ADJECTIVE

Expressing contempt or ridicule:

Ridiculous

ADJECTIVE

Deserving or inviting derision or mockery; absurd:

Contemptuous

ADJECTIVE

Showing contempt; scornful:

  • 2
    Above and beyond the call of duty! Play along with the second mockery, PLEEEEEEASE! – Good A.M. Jan 24 '15 at 0:32
  • +1 for good advice as well as an answer... – McB Jan 27 '15 at 20:32
9

Well, they are being sarcastic. If you want to roll with the superiority they say you have, you can call them a pissant (bonus if you pronounce it in the more British-sounding stlye, as 'pissent' with one syllable) or peasant - but that isn't what they are doing to you.

They are engaging in satire or mockery, and attempting to lampoon and caricature you. They may be trying to parody or burlesque you (that last one is a weird/uncommon but technically valid usage.

Depending on how disproportionate their characterization of you is and how comical they are seeking to be, you can pick the word that fits the most. But I most like "caricature", for the meaning:

make or give a comically or grotesquely exaggerated representation of (someone or something)

  • 3
    LOL! Pissant is good: rolls out of one of his absurd comments. – Good A.M. Jan 24 '15 at 0:32
3

It's really just Obnoxious Sarcasm

Generally, the literal meaning (of the words) is different than what the speaker intends to say through sarcasm. Sarcasm is a literary and rhetorical device that is meant to mock with often satirical or ironic remarks with a purpose to amuse and hurt someone or some section of society simultaneously. [Obnoxious sarcasm] makes people feel like punching the speaker in the face. It is not very funny and it gets under your skin.

So, what you want to call him is really up for grabs. Is there a personality type that resorts to obnoxious sarcasm? I doubt there's just one.

Whether he's a poor sport, puerile, infantile or just an asshat, I doubt that there is a specific name for this type of behavior.

Puerile and infantile are used derogatorily to suggest extreme immaturity, especially with regard to social manners: a puerile joke; an infantile boast.

  • 1
    +1 would that I could up-vote this twice @medica - it seems the villagers want bells & whistles. – user98990 Jan 24 '15 at 19:49
3

I don't have an answer for you, but I do have some unsolicited advice: “Don’t wrestle with a pig. You will both get covered in shit, and the pig likes it.”

  • 1
    You gave an answer (after a fashion)! OP sought "A word for someone..." You supplied one, adding some good advice to top it off. – user98990 Jan 24 '15 at 1:41
2

I'd use sarcastic flattery to describe it:

  • eccessive praise that is not sincere.
2

Well, I think part of the answer lies in the question itself... Sarcasm is best suited here..But, to answer your question more specifically, I think the first two examples are hyperbolic sarcasm ("Hyperbole" is a figurative language when you massively exaggerate for the sake of emphasis) and the third example - "What other orders do you have for us, lowly, insignificant ants?!" is self-deprecating sarcasm. Now, if you want a word for a person who is sarcastic to you, it would largely depend on the intention of the speaker. It may be a defense mechanism for him or a tool to create ambiguity or may be he is trying to play down your achievements out of envy in which case you can use disparage, belittle, downplay, cry down.

"Lat night in the party he was obsessively picking up on me and was trying to belittle my achievements."

  • I'm going to up-vote this answer because it's directly on-point. And because I like your style! One thing before I go, sarcastic self-deprecation negates the deprecation. I'm sure you realize that an just wrote it up wrong. Why not adjust with an edit? Nice response. – user98990 Jan 24 '15 at 1:29
  • Thanks for your up vote..When I said its self-deprecating sarcasm I meant its kind. The person is saying self-deprecating things but in sarcastic tone. – Shilpam Dubey Jan 24 '15 at 18:46

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