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I tutored an American exchange student in Finland last year and occasionally he, on Facebook, would say something like "word thank you" or simply "word" and he said it means "okay". I was curious and tried to do a bit of research but didn't really find anything. Is this kind of use for the word "word" in any way common? Where does it come from?

marked as duplicate by Jim, Edwin Ashworth, TimLymington, Janus Bahs Jacquet, tchrist Jan 20 '15 at 1:32

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  • Ah, I was looking for that kind of answer. Definitely mine is a duplicate. Searching was a bit difficult, as "word" gives thousands of results...Sorry for the inconvenience. – Valtteri Jan 19 '15 at 21:54
  • @Valtteri- No worries. – Jim Jan 19 '15 at 21:56
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Word, interj:

  • Slang Used to express approval or an affirmative response to something. Sometimes used with up. (From Random House Kernerman Webster's College )

  • Sometimes, word up. Slang. (used to express satisfaction, approval, or agreement): You got a job? Word! (from American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language)

"Word up":

  • is a slang phrase used to agree with a statement. For example, when two friends are discussing a topic in an informal setting, one might say “word up” to agree with the other. Sometimes the idiom is also used as a greeting or to mean “I hear you” or “How are you?” In general, it is a very versatile urban slang term, and the meaning can change based on region. The phrase likely originated from urban areas as a shortened form of other idioms, but its popularity increased after the release of a song and album of the same name in the late 1980s.

  • The most common use of "word up" is as an affirmation of something. It is typically not used in formal settings, such as the workplace, weddings, and dinner parties. On the other hand, it is particularly popular among young people, usually in universities or casual gatherings. A specific example of the usage of the term might be someone saying "word up" in response to, “I think this music band is the best.” The person saying the idiom usually nods as he or she says it.

  • Word, now I know it is not just something he uses. – Valtteri Jan 19 '15 at 21:52

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