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Is there a word in English denoting the time it took to assign a task to a person? This word is to be used in a web page design to display a certain task that is assigned to a a specific person and the time it took to assign.

Task#: 123
Assigned to: MR. Nobody
Assigned <the-word>: 10 minutes

The first thing that hits my mind is to use "Assigned in: 10 minutes" but I think it is not trivial. There should be a better phrase to communicate the idea without being vague.

Any alternative phrase communicating this idea is also appreciated.

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  • To be assigned in : 10 minutes.
    – user66974
    Jan 9, 2015 at 1:23
  • "...without being wage." -- Did you mean "vague"?
    – Hot Licks
    Feb 8, 2015 at 1:14
  • @HotLicks yes I meant vague :) that was one super typo :D
    – kaptan
    Feb 9, 2015 at 10:21
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    To me "Assigned within: 10 minutes" is difficult to misunderstand, and seems narrower (in a good way) than "Assigned in: 10 minutes."
    – Sven Yargs
    Feb 13, 2015 at 1:04
  • @SvenYargs Can you add this as an answer?
    – kaptan
    Feb 13, 2015 at 3:47

3 Answers 3

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As I noted in a comment above, I think that "Assigned within: 10 minutes" is difficult to misunderstand, and seems narrower (in a good way) than "Assigned in: 10 minutes." Of course, like most responses to single-word requests, this one is highly subjective.

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A more understandable phrase might be:

Unassigned for: 10 minutes

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  • Assuming of course that the task wasn't unassigned for two days before someone looked at it and spent ten minutes assigning it to someone. Feb 8, 2015 at 2:36
  • @JanusBahsJacquet Typically the time is measured since the task arrived in the queue, not since someone looked at it. You don't usually care how long the assigner took in the process of assigning, but how much delay there is between someone reporting something and it getting assigned.
    – Barmar
    Feb 8, 2015 at 6:05
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If indeed it is meant as the time it took to establish or set the assignment then for me "in" is most correct.

As a linguistically poor (monolingual), native English speaker I should take care not to overcomplicate my use of the language for others, but in this case it would be clear: If it is intended to mean the time it took to establish or set the assignment "in" is the word I would use.

Instead, a time assignment like this might be intended to mean the "duration" allowed, allocated or given to complete the task in the future.

We know the Task is assigned, but do not know if it is done or completed from the context. It may not be relevant, but if the intended meaning is the time given for doing the task instead of setting the assignment, then I would recommend use of the word "duration", e.g. "Estimated Duration: 10 minutes"

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