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I have a sentence:

The term “politics” has its origins as politicus, a Greek word meaning, “of or belonging to civil polity or to the State” (Lewis).

  • Should the "of" in the quotes be capitalized?
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    Is it a proper name? Is it the first word in a sentence? Is it the word "I"? (no, no, and no) Then No. :-) – Hellion Jan 8 '15 at 16:11
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No. Indeed even if Lewis had capitalised it, many styles would have you recast it to lower-case though this is something style-guides differ on, but there's certainly no reason whatsoever to turn a lower-case letter in the source that is not at the start of your sentence to upper-case.

Another question is whether state should be lower-cased, as it's not as commonly title-cased in such a use as it was in 1879. In that case though I would leave it, since it's not completely weird in modern use, and even so you can expect readers to understand that what is within quotes may have different capitalisation styles that what is outside it.

You could, but don't have to, opt to run the quote on without a comma too:

The term politics has its origins as politicus, a Greek word meaning “of or belonging to civil polity or to the State” (Lewis).

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