1

Although later I was forced to accept the fact that fairy tale's magic wand which can literally change the whole world in a second was a fiction, I was never conjured to quit my exploitation to seek out the sober (version of) “magic wand” in real life.

By "sober magic wand", I refer to very powerful means like marketing, advertisement. I am afraid that the combination of "sober" and "magic" does not make sense. What do you think?

  • Try googling "sober magic" (include the double inverted commas) and see how many hits you get. – Edwin Ashworth Jan 7 '15 at 10:13
  • 2
    It's "sober wand" that doesn't make sense. Sober means either "not intoxicated" or "serious", at least as far as I know. If it has other meanings, I'm unaware of them and I would be willing to bet most readers are too. – EFrog Jan 7 '15 at 10:30
  • @EFrog and presumably they mean "serious" here, opposing the less serious fairy tales. I might object that fairy tales are a considerably more serious business than marketing or advertisement, but lingually there's nothing to object to. – Jon Hanna Jan 7 '15 at 10:40
  • 2
    No matter how hard I try, I can’t force my brain to accept the ‘serious’ meaning of sober in this context. I invariably stumble on it and think, “So where’s the drunk magic wand, then?”. I would not use it if I were you. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jan 7 '15 at 11:02
  • Based on my description, can you think of a more acceptable word for me? Simply say "serious magic wand"? Or, sober and moderate magic wand, more sober and pragmatic magic wand in real life? – benlogos Jan 7 '15 at 12:18
1

It mostly makes sense.

There's a tension between the words that means they don't fit perfectly with each other (in these senses), but surely that's the point of the analogy, no?

| improve this answer | |
  • Yes, that maybe the effect I want. But still it is inappropriate for me. Maybe a well advanced writer can write that way. – benlogos Jan 7 '15 at 12:10
  • "Real" has less sparkle, but would serve. "Everyday" is somewhere between the two. – Jon Hanna Jan 7 '15 at 12:17
1

Although later I was forced to accept the fact that fairy tale's magic wand which can literally change the whole world in a second was a fiction, I was never conjured to quit my exploitation to seek out the sober (version of) “magic wand” in real life.

No, "sober magic wand" doesn't work. Also, although it's not a hard-and-fast rule, it's better to use "that" than "which" for a restrictive clause. "Exploitation" is not the word you want. You don't need to use scare quotes around "magic wand." And you might try simplifying your sentences and cutting some of your modifiers. Consider this version:

I eventually accepted that magic wands only exist in fairly tales. But I never stopped looking for ways to cast spells on the world around me. And that's when I discovered marketing--real life magic!

| improve this answer | |
0

I agree, the meaning you are shooting for is a bit obscured by the choice of "sober". You could try the opposite of "fairy-tale", and use real-life magic wand, or relate it more to your subject: "The magic wand of mass media."

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.