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Which is more correct when fitting into this sentence:

"... the course is new to me is what motivates me to study it."

That is, of these two, which is more correct:

Just by the fact that the course is new to me is what motivates me to study it.

Just the fact that the course is new to me is what motivates me to study it.

Thanks!

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  • The body of your question does not match the title. Please rewrite them to clarify what you are asking. Jan 2 '15 at 4:49
  • @BrianHitchcock I submitted an edit which I believe reflects the OP's original intent. Jan 2 '15 at 5:20
  • Welcome to EL&U. Please note that general proofreading of the "is this correct" variety is off-topic here, though we can help you if you can identify a specific problem— what is the full context where you find these phrases? Why do you think one is more correct than the other, for what meaning you are trying to convey? The site tour and help center may offer additional guidance on how to use this site.
    – choster
    Jan 2 '15 at 6:25
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The second is correct. In the first, "just by the fact that x" creates an adverbial phrase, which needs to have a verb associated with it. For example "Just by the fact that the course is new to me, I could tell it would be challenging." However, the latter part of the sentence in both your examples "is what motivates. . . " equates the first part with a noun phrase. Taking out "by" balances the equation: (noun phrase) = (noun phrase)

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