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there are some people who are your friend in the time of need,and they ignore you the other times,so what do you call them? a poet calls them "flies around a sweetmeat".

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"a fair-weather friend" is an idiom.

  • "someone who is your friend only when things are pleasant or going well for you" TFD
  • "loyal or helpful only during times of success and happiness" Merriam-Webster

You could also say "an opportunistic friend", "an opportunistic friendship"

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    Another quote for you, from Ambrose Bierce’s The Devil’s Dictionary: “FRIENDSHIP, n. A ship big enough to carry two in fair weather, but only one in foul.” – J. C. Salomon Jan 1 '15 at 5:56
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The term I would use is "false friends."

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"What you mean, 'We,' kemosabe?"

This [the following additions, to obey the site's rules to the letter] is very much like having to explain a joke after you've told it, but Howard Schweber writes at The World Post, 1969:

In a classic Mad Magazine cartoon ... the Lone Ranger and Tonto are surrounded by a horde of hostile Indian warriors. The Lone Ranger says to Tonto "what do we do, now?," to which Tonto replies, "what you mean 'we,' kemosabe?"

[Tonto usually referred to his senior partner as 'kemosabe'] [and the 'real' Tonto wouldn't have dreamt of such disloyalty]

The joke is old and quite well known. At the link Punchline Regularly Tossed Out Without the Jokes They Come From, 'Chanteuse' adds: 'I always heard this said, "What mean WE, white man?" ' I came across it recently in one of Trow's Maxwell novels.

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    You should probably add a reference/link or two to this one. To anyone who (like me) has never seen The Lone Ranger, this answer makes little sense, and the final word none at all. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 31 '14 at 23:47
  • Then how did you make sense of it? – Edwin Ashworth Jan 1 '15 at 1:16
  • By failing to find it in two dictionaries, then googling it and finding it on Wikipedia… and I'm still not sure I quite get it. Answers should be self-contained at least to the extent that they give the reader access to more information about difficult or obscure elements without him having to fend for himself googling unknown entities. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jan 1 '15 at 1:30
  • Strange. A Google search for "What you mean, 'We,' kemosabe?" (notice I included exterior double inverted commas just to be helpful) gives the 'World Post' explanation of the saying (and its probable origin) as the first of 50 000 purported hits. I should think it's a witticism familiar to many on the site. "False friends" is equally easy to find, which is why I didn't add the comment 'Answers should be self-contained at least to the extent that they give the reader access to more information about difficult or obscure elements without him having to fend for himself googling unknown entities'. – Edwin Ashworth Jan 1 '15 at 15:26
  • False friends doesn’t require any further information than that given in the words themselves to understand the phrase: it is the sum of the literal meanings of false and friend. That doesn’t mean an explanation or reference shouldn’t be given; but yours is (apparently) a direct quote, and its meaning cannot be deduced simply from the words themselves, which makes it all the more relevant to include a source and an explanation. I have to admit I am quite baffled as to why you think this otherwise integral part of an SE answer does not apply here. As it is, this is not a useful answer. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jan 1 '15 at 15:56
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Although not exact you may also want to consider

Left out in the cold

or

Fair weather friend

or

Dropped like a hot potato

Individual words which apply to the set of circumstances you describe are

Ostracised

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