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Whether the integration of the refugees into the local community can be feasible depends on the manner in which and the rate at which this happens.

Or

Whether the integration of the refugees into the local community can be feasible depends on the manner and the rate in/at which this happens.

I'm confused as to which word "in/at which" should be determined by; "manner" or "rate".

Any suggestions?

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  • You need at here. – Araucaria - Not here any more. Dec 31 '14 at 13:19
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    "Data can be imported to and exported from the application." So, it should be: "Whether the integration of the refugees into the local community can be feasible depends on the manner in which and the rate at which this happens."? – Juristen Dec 31 '14 at 13:25
  • Use "at"- Whether the integration of the refugees into the local community can be feasible depends on "the" manner and "the" rate "at" which this happens. You can also drop 'the" from the rate. – Misti Dec 31 '14 at 13:31
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    @Mysti Sinha Your authority for claiming this practice (which goes against everything I've seen written on the subject) as acceptable would be? – Edwin Ashworth Jan 9 '15 at 17:09
  • To a native speaker, there is no question that manner takes "in" and rate takes "at". To test...reverse the phrase: "in which manner" is correct - "at which manner" is just wrong. "at which rate" is correct - "in which rate" is usually wrong unless you're speaking of a rate such as an interest rate that includes fees or penalties where what's in the rate would be applicable. I'm amazed how often prepositions trip up non-native speakers. – Kristina Lopez Jan 9 '15 at 18:51
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Things happen IN a manner, which might be controlled, or random, and happen AT a rate, which might be slow or fast.

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